Criminal Justice in Society (B.S.)

CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice (4 hours)

A survey course providing an overall view of the criminal justice system, the law, law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
CRMJS 2110 Police and Society (4 hours)

This course provides an analysis of the structure-function of law enforcement and the dilemma confronting the police in relation with the community.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

CRMJS 2120 Criminal Law (4 hours)

Survey of criminal law with emphasis on basic legal procedure developed by the courts and legal problems of law enforcement.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
CRMJS 2130 Corrections (4 hours)

Analysis of the history, theory, structure, and function of contemporary penal institutions.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
CRMJS 2140 Juvenile Justice (4 hours)

This course examines the unique framework and workings of the juvenile justice system. This system is in the process of on-going profound changes in both legal rights and corrections. We will examine the reasons why juveniles commit crimes and status offenses. The current issues in juvenile justice such as: gangs, growth in "female" criminal involvement, and the hardening of juvenile offenders are also considered.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread
CRMJS 2210 Probation and Parole (4 hours)

This course explores the types of probation and parole, the demand for probation and parole, the advantages and disadvantages of probation and parole, the job duties and qualifications necessary for probation and parole officers, and how probation and parole is integrated into the criminal justice system.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
CRMJS 2300 Current Issues: Gangs and Gang Culture (3 hours)

Gangs and gang culture is a cutting edge course that explores what gang culture is like, how and why youth join gangs, how hard is it to exit gangs, how the gang culture affects youth and youth decision making, the most effective and least effective ways to combat the growth of gangs, and how communities have failed or been effective at halting gangs.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

CRMJS 2310 Current Issues: White Collar Crime (3 hours)

White Collar Crime studies the varied and complex nature of white collar crimes and white collar criminals. The course examines the criminological explanations for white collar crime. The students will get the opportunity to talk with individuals who have committed white collar crimes. The course reviews the various kinds of white collar crime and the role of technology in white collar crimes.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice.

CRMJS 3150 Criminology (4 hours)

This course offers an examination of contemporary problems in crime and delinquency with emphasis upon the theories of deviant behavior and correction.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice and SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Justice Thread
CRMJS 3400 Applied Criminal Justice: Prison Outreach (1 hour)

Students teach Criminal Justice courses to inmates at the State Penitentiary. The students will apply and expand their understanding of Criminal Justice by teaching inmates criminal justice concepts. The topics covered in a given semester vary but can include material typically found in courses like: Introduction to Criminal Justice, Crime and Delinquency, and Criminal Law. Under the guidance of the course instructor, students prepare and deliver lessons directly to inmates in their capacity as non-matriculated adult learners. In preparation of their time in the prison setting, students organize the curriculum, research the concepts, and prepare a lesson plan for teaching the concepts. Students then present the concepts, assess how that teaching process went for them and for the inmates, and finally, test the inmates on the level of learning of those concepts. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite(s): CRMJS 1010 Introduction to Criminal Justice and permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
CRMJS 3800 Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Proj I (4 hours)

The Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Project (JRMP) is an experiential learning course that seeks to assist youth transitioning back to the community from a congregate care setting. The program matches undergraduate student mentors with youth in the juvenile justice system. Students will receive professional skill development through classroom instruction and experience working directly with the youth and juvenile justice system professionals. Students must commit one calendar year to the match and enroll in two consecutive semesters (CRMJS 3800/CRMJS 3810). Junior or senior level standing preferred.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
CRMJS 3810 Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Proj II (4 hours)

The Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Project (JRMP) is an experiential learning course that seeks to assist youth transitioning back to the community from a congregate care setting. The program matches undergraduate student mentors with youth in the juvenile justice system. Students will receive professional skill development through classroom instruction and experience working directly with the youth and juvenile justice system professionals. Students must commit one calendar year to the match and enroll in two consecutive semesters (CRMJS 3800/CRMJS 3810). Junior or senior level standing preferred.

Prerequisite: CRMJS 3800 Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Proj I and permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
CRMJS 4970 Internship (1-8 hours)

See SOC 4970 Internship.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
CRMJS 4980 Senior Seminar (1 hour)

This seminar enables Sociology-Anthropology, Criminal Justice in Society, and
Business-Sociology majors to work collaboratively, to reflect upon and showcase cumulative disciplinary learning and experiences, skills, and ethics, and to develop individual professional selves.  Students meet weekly to share internship
and thesis experiences, develop public speaking skills, reflect upon cumulative learning, and develop a professional portfolio.  The seminar culminates in an Ignite or Pecha Kucha
presentation (or a Pecha Kucha film) at a departmental showcase. 

Prerequisite(s):  Permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered every fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology (4 hours)

This course is an introduction to using the sociological perspective as a method of social inquiry. Students explore such basic concepts as culture, socialization, social structure, social interaction, and social change. They study and apply the theories and research methodologies used to investigate human social interaction. These concepts are applied to social topics such as race, class, gender, family, crime, population, environment, and others.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
SOC 1330 Race Relations and Minority Groups (4 hours)

See SOC 2330 Race Relations and Minority Groups.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
SOC 1350 Sociology of the Family (4 hours)

See SOC 2350 Sociology of the Family.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2330 Race Relations and Minority Groups (4 hours)

This course uses sociological perspectives to examine the causes and consequences of a society stratified by racial-ethinic diversity. It looks at the way historical decisions made by the dominant group have impacted the current situation for majority-minority relations in the U.S.A structural assessment of current social relations is emphasized although individual prejudice and discrimination is examined. Concepts such as white-privilege, immigration, and institutional discrimination are investigated. The requirements of the 2330 course are the same as the 1330 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a 20 hour service-learning component which fulfills an exploratory experiential learning requirement of the Archway Curriculum.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
SOC 2350 Sociology of the Family (4 hours)

This course offers an analysis of various interrelationships of men and women with emphasis on love, courtship, marriage, and family. Institutional, social, and policy perspectives are presented in a cross-cultural and historical frame of reference to clarify the dynamic relationship between the family, its members, and broader U.S. society. The requirements of the 2350 course are the same as the 1350 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a field interview project that involves significant writing and which fulfills the writing instructive designation of Archway.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2380 Women and Crime (4 hours)

See SOC 3380 Women and Crime.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2910 Social Statistics (4 hours)

In this course students are introduced to descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications to sociological research. Statistical procedures include central tendency measures, variability, t-test, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, and chi square. The course also includes specific training in using SPSS for analysis.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
SOC 3380 Women and Crime (4 hours)

This course uses a sociological perspective to explore gendered issues that women face as perpetrators, victims, and workers in the criminal justice system. As such, students will explore theories and empirical studies related to offending, victimization, and employment. This course is cross listed with GEND 3380 and meets with SOC 2380/GEND 2380. The requirements of the 3380 course will be the same as the 2380 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number conduct an additional major project as determined by the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 3540 Urban Communities (4 hours)

See SOC 4540 Urban Communities.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
SOC 3930 Quantitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to quantitative research methods commonly used in social science research: survey research, experimental design, secondary analysis, and evaluation research. Emphasis is on survey research, including project design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data collection, statistical analysis, and formal presentation of results. Key elements of the course are learning to ask researchable questions and formulate testable hypotheses.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology and any Statistics course (SOC 2910 Social Statistics is preferred.)

Normally offered each fall semester.

SOC 3940 Qualitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to qualitative research methods commonly used in social science research. Emphasis is on individualized project design, project construction, data analysis, and formal presentation of results. Course content includes exploration of observation, participant observation, ethnography, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, content analysis, case study, and online qualitative innovations in research.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.

Normally offered each spring semester.

SOC 4540 Urban Communities (4 hours)

This course examines urban communities and their historical roots. Topics covered include demographic and ecological trends, cross-cultural variations, and current theories about urban processes and community in order to foster an understanding of this dominant form of human social organization. Students engage in field study in areas such as community development, urban administration, spatial organization, and contemporary social problems. The requirements of the 4540 course are the same as the 3540 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a semester-length field project relevant to the course material.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive