Business-Sociology (B.S.)

The business-sociology degree combines courses in business, accounting and economics with courses in sociology and anthropology.

ACCT 1310 Principles of Accounting I (3 hours)

This is an introduction to the basic accounting model and the framework for developing financial statements. The major focus is on the study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to the measurement of income and the presentation of a firm's financial position.
(Normally offered each semester.)

BUSAD 2000 Principles of Marketing (3 hours)

Students examine the role of marketing in society with an introduction to the fundamentals of strategic marketing planning and the development of the marketing mix. Topics include buyer behavior, market segmentation, distribution, pricing policies, communication strategies, and product development.
(Normally offered each semester.)

BUSAD 2100 Business and Economic Statistics (3 hours)

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include gathering, organizing, interpreting, and presenting data with emphasis on hypothesis testing as a method for decision making in the fields of business and economics. Procedures include z-tests, t-tests, ANOVAs, correlation, and simple regression.
Cross listed with ECON 2100.
Prerequisite(s): Demonstrated proficiency in high school algebra or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each semester.)

BUSAD 2500 Principles of Management (3 hours)

An introduction to management theory and practice. Students explore the history of management and the environment in which managers operate. Classroom discussion focuses on the basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Leadership Thread
BUSAD 2700 Business Law I (3 hours)

An introduction to the law, the courts, torts and contracts. It will also explore the law's application to business. This is a required course for Business Administration and Accounting majors.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each semester.)

BUSAD 3000 Organizational Behavior (3 hours)

This course provides a conceptual framework for understanding behavior within the organization. Students explore behavior at the individual, group, and organizational levels. Units of analysis include personality, leadership, conflict, motivation, power, and politics.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C-" or better in BUSAD 2500 Principles of Management or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Leadership Thread
BUSAD 3200 Human Resource Management (3 hours)

An in-depth study of current policies and problems in human resource management. Subjects include human resource planning, recruiting, selection, training, management development, compensation, discipline, labor relations, equal employment opportunity laws/regulations, and human resource management policies.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
BUSAD 4100 Advanced Human Resource Management (3 hours)

Labor legislation, labor trends, and many controversial and contemporary human resource management problems are explored. The course is taught by case method along with lecture and general discussion of selected topics related to current personnel problems and trends. The cases used are designed to demonstrate the student's ability to apply sound human resource management concepts and principles in arriving at effective and workable solutions to complex contemporary problems.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C-" or better in BUSAD 3200 Human Resource Management.

BUSAD 4700 Entrepreneurship (3 hours)

Students use multidisciplinary business skills to identify, analyze, and execute practical management solutions to the various problems and opportunities of a small business enterprise. The major projects preparation of an actual business plan. Lectures and guest speakers from the community help provide students a clearer understanding of the link between theoretical studies and the practical world of business.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and grades of "C-" or better in ACCT 1310 Principles of Accounting I, BUSAD 2500 Principles of Management and BUSAD 2000 Principles of Marketing, or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Innovation Thread
BUSAD 4970 Business Internship (3 hours)

Each student must work with the department internship coordinator to obtain a business-related internship related to the specific area of emphasis or interest of the student. This course presents each student the opportunity for work-related application of business interest. Under special circumstances, a second internship may be taken for credit with the approval of the business department chair and the internship coordinator.
No Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the department internship coordinator.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
ECON 1530 Macroeconomic Principles (3 hours)

An examination of the macroeconomic theories, problems, and policies of the U.S. economy. Topics include supply and demand, a description of the main sectors of the economy, and the role of government in stabilizing the economy with monetary and fiscal policies.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Going Global Thread
ECON 1540 Microeconomic Principles (3 hours)

An examination of the microeconomic theories, problems, and policies of the U.S. economy. Topics include the theory of the firm, market structures, and current economic issues such as income distribution, antitrust policy, poverty, the farm problem, and international trade.
Prerequisite(s): ECON 1530 Macroeconomic Principles strongly recommended.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
ECON 2100 Business and Economic Statistics (3 hours)

See BUSAD 2100 Business and Economic Statistics.
 

SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology (4 hours)

This course is an introduction to using the sociological perspective as a method of social inquiry. Students explore such basic concepts as culture, socialization, social structure, social interaction, and social change. They study and apply the theories and research methodologies used to investigate human social interaction. These concepts are applied to social topics such as race, class, gender, family, crime, population, environment, and others.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
SOC 1330 Race Relations and Minority Groups (4 hours)

See SOC 2330 Race Relations and Minority Groups.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
SOC 1350 Sociology of the Family (4 hours)

See SOC 2350 Sociology of the Family.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2330 Race Relations and Minority Groups (4 hours)

This course uses sociological perspectives to examine the causes and consequences of a society stratified by racial-ethinic diversity. It looks at the way historical decisions made by the dominant group have impacted the current situation for majority-minority relations in the U.S.A structural assessment of current social relations is emphasized although individual prejudice and discrimination is examined. Concepts such as white-privilege, immigration, and institutional discrimination are investigated. The requirements of the 2330 course are the same as the 1330 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a 20 hour service-learning component which fulfills an exploratory experiential learning requirement of the Archway Curriculum.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
SOC 2350 Sociology of the Family (4 hours)

This course offers an analysis of various interrelationships of men and women with emphasis on love, courtship, marriage, and family. Institutional, social, and policy perspectives are presented in a cross-cultural and historical frame of reference to clarify the dynamic relationship between the family, its members, and broader U.S. society. The requirements of the 2350 course are the same as the 1350 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a field interview project that involves significant writing and which fulfills the writing instructive designation of Archway.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2360 Gender and Society (4 hours)

See SOC 3360 Gender and Society.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2530 Population and Environment (4 hours)

This course examines the demographic and social dynamics of population size, composition, and distribution. It addresses the relationships among population, human health, development and the environment. Strong cross-cultural emphasis. A major focus is the development of a semester research paper contrasting the status of the Millennium and Sustainable Development Goals, environmental status, and health in a more- and less- developed country.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
SOC 2910 Social Statistics (4 hours)

In this course students are introduced to descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications to sociological research. Statistical procedures include central tendency measures, variability, t-test, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, and chi square. The course also includes specific training in using SPSS for analysis.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

SOC 3360 Gender and Society (4 hours)

This course uses the sociological perspective to explore sex and gender relations as major features of social life. It considers the social construction of gender (including the creation of masculinities and femininities) and examines the impact of gender ideologies on the social positions of women and men. In particular, it emphasizes the way these social positions (such as gender, race, social class, sexualities, etc.) create and perpetuate the inequalities embedded in its social institutions (like the family, economy/work, religion, media, etc.) This course is cross listed with GEND 3360 and meets with SOC 2360/GEND 2360. The requirements of the 3360 course are the same as the 2360 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete an additional project as determined by the instructor.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 3370 Social Inequality (4 hours)

See SOC 4370 Social Inequality.

SOC 3520 Group Dynamics (4 hours)

Since all social interaction takes place in groups, this course introduces students to the basic principles of small group structure and interaction. Students participate in group activities throughout the semester in order to study and reflect on the way groups function and influence individual behavior and identity. Topics such as goals, cohesiveness, communication, conflict, and leadership are investigated.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered every other year.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
SOC 3540 Urban Communities (4 hours)

See SOC 4540 Urban Communities.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
SOC 3920 Social Theory (4 hours)

This course explores a broad overview of big ideas about humans, society, change, stability, and chaos that have influenced sociology and other social sciences in the 19th to early 21st centuries. Broad perspectives examined include: Marxism, Functionalism, Weberian rationalization, Symbolic Interactionism, Feminisms, Queer Theory, Critical Theory, Critical Race Theory, Rational Choice, Postmodernism and Poststructuralism, and theories of globalization. This course builds critical thinking, analysis, application, and writing skills essential to majors, minors, and students interested in critically examining society.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
SOC 3960 Quantitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to quantitative research methods commonly used in social science research: survey research, experimental design, secondary analysis, and evaluation research.  Emphasis is on survey research, including project design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data collection, statistical analysis, and formal presentation of results.  Key elements of the course are learning to ask researchable questions and formulate testable hypotheses.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology and any Statistics course (SOC 2910 Social Statistics is preferred.)
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

SOC 3970 Qualitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to qualitative research methods commonly used in social science research.  Emphasis is on individualized project design, project construction, data analysis, and formal presentation of results.  Course content includes exploration of observation, participant observation, ethnography, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, content analysis, case study, and online qualitative innovations in research.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

SOC 4540 Urban Communities (4 hours)

This course examines urban communities and their historical roots. Topics covered include demographic and ecological trends, cross-cultural variations, and current theories about urban processes and community in order to foster an understanding of this dominant form of human social organization. Students engage in field study in areas such as community development, urban administration, spatial organization, and contemporary social problems. The requirements of the 4540 course are the same as the 3540 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a semester-length field project relevant to the course material.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
SOC 4970 Internship (1-8 hours)

This course is a field placement at an agency/organization that is related to the student's area of career interest. Substantial field contact hours and regular meetings with instructor are required. The course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours. No Pass/Fail. Cross listed with CRMJS 4970.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.
(Normally offered every year.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
SOC 4990 Thesis (1-4 hours)

This course requires the completion of an independent sociological research project in a topic area of interest to the student. The completed project should be conference quality scientific article can be presented to the academic community in such formats as the NWU Student Symposium or a discipline related conference. Students are responsible for all phases of the research process, including topic selection, academic literature review, definition of the population; sample selection; methodology, data collection and analysis and preparation of the final report (thesis). The paper and the presentation should give evidence that the student is capable of critical integration, synthesis, and analysis of ideas as well as having gained professional-level written and oral communication skills, thereby showing mastery of the departmental goals and objectives. No Pass/Fail. Cross-listed with ANTHR 4990 and CRMJS 4990.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive