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Stephanie Loos, Staff Assistant
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International Studies Minor

Below is the coursework required to minor in international studies. For an overview of this program, see International Studies Degrees.

Core Requirements 10-12 hours
International Studies Minor (25-27 hours)

A. Global Perspectives (take two courses from the following options):

7-8 hours

B. Cultural and Scientific Perspectives (choose one course from the following options):

3-4 hours
Modern Language Requirement 6 hours

The language requirement may be completed in one of the following ways:

  1. 6 hours of any language
  2. Students whose second language is English may be exempted from the requirement by the International Studies Director
 
Emphasis Area 9 hours

All minors must complete an emphasis area of courses in a specific world region or topical area. The International Studies Director will work with students to create an emphasis area that reflects their strengths. Examples of recent emphasis areas include Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, Industrialized Nations, Foreign Policy, or Development Studies but students may create their own emphasis with the approval of the International Studies Director.

At least two of the courses in the emphasis area must be taken at Nebraska Wesleyan University. One course must be at the 3000 or 4000-level.

 

ANTHR 1150 Cultural Anthropology (4 hours)

This course reviews the origin and development of culture in preliterate human societies. It focuses on the major social institutions of family, economics, political organization, and religion.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion – Global
ARH 1030FYW Survey of Non-Western Art History (4 hours)

This course surveys the art of “Non-Western” societies from prehistory to the present. Cultures discussed include South and Southeast Asia, China and Japan, Africa, and cultures of the Americas (Pre-Conquest and Native American). The term “Non-Western” traditionally refers to cultures that initially developed outside the realm of Western culture and at some distance from the European artistic tradition. The term is not only excessively broad but also problematic, because it implies an opposition to western art. We will explore these issues. The main objective of the course is to provide students with a global perspective on the richness and diversity of art produced by the cultures studied. It also considers the impact of colonization and globalization on the treatment of artworks from non-western cultures and the development of new art forms.

Archway Curriculum: First-Year Curriculum: First-Year Writing
Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion – Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Going Global Thread
BIO 1300 Introduction to Environmental Science (4 hours)

An introduction to environmental science and scientific methodology using the environment as the system of study. The goals are to help the student develop a better understanding of the environment, gain insight into human-caused problems found in nature, explore the relationships of humanity with the environment, and provide practical experience in performing scientific measurements and experiments.
Three lectures per week.
One 3-hour lab per week.
Does not count toward a biology major.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Natural Science Laboratory
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread
HIST 1110 World Civilizations (4 hours)

An in-depth study of one time frame across world cultures. The course is designed to introduce students to the uniqueness and interconnectedness of cultures in the global community. Historical dimensions of today's ethical and political concerns will be examined in order to foster responsible world citizenship. Course topics change regularly and may include a global survey of the twentieth century or the history of indigenous nations leading up to the Age of European Exploration. (Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion – Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Going Global Thread
PHYS 1200 Energy and the Global Environment (4 hours)

A course covering some of the most critical problems facing the world today - those relating to the production, distribution, and use of energy. The basic concepts of heat, work, electricity and energy as they apply to energy use around the world will be studied. The major source of energy, their value and importance, the historical and future demand for energy and the specific environmental problems and benefits encountered will be identified.
Three lectures and one laboratory per week.
Prerequisite(s): One year of high school algebra or permission of instructor.
(Normally offered alternate fall semesters.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Natural Science Laboratory
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread
POLSC 1100 Introduction to International Politics (4 hours)

This course provides an introduction to the concepts, theories and methods of international politics. It highlights the similarities and differences between political systems, as well the nature of relations between these political systems. By examining political violence, democratization, security, trade, and development, this class will equip students to analyze current problems and experiences.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Going Global Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
RELIG 1150 World Religions (3 hours)

This course is a study of the cultural settings, lives of founders when appropriate, oral or written traditions and literature, worldviews, myths, rituals, ideals of conduct, and development of some of the world's religions. Religions studied will typically include tribal religions, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confuciansim, Shinto, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism, and Bahai. Readings, videos, and websites will help introduce and illustrate not only the cultural settings in which these religions appear, but also the voices and faces of contemporary religious practitioners.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion – Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread