Sport Management (B.S.)

Careers in sport management are geared toward the expansive world of sports. Behind the players and the game itself, there are infrastructures in place to ensure the games continue. As in all businesses, sports organizations need managers, accountants, marketing and advertising managers, sales people and operations managers to organize and operate effectively.

Learning Outcomes
Majors will be able to:

  1. Expand the overall breadth of knowledge of the sport industry.
  2. Effectively and appropriately communicate through oral and written skills
  3. Problem solve - to critically think and analyze situations to find solutions through experience and conversation.

ACCT 1310 Principles of Accounting I (3 hours)

This is an introduction to the basic accounting model and the framework for developing financial statements. The major focus is on the study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to the measurement of income and the presentation of a firm's financial position.
(Normally offered each semester.)

ACCT 1320 Principles of Accounting II (3 hours)

The role of accounting in the formation and capitalization of corporations is studied. Other topics include cash flow, analysis and interpretation of financial statements, and basic managerial accounting.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C-" or better in ACCT 1310 Principles of Accounting I.
(Normally offered each semester.)

BUSAD 2000 Principles of Marketing (3 hours)

Students examine the role of marketing in society with an introduction to the fundamentals of strategic marketing planning and the development of the marketing mix. Topics include buyer behavior, market segmentation, distribution, pricing policies, communication strategies, and product development.
(Normally offered each semester.)

BUSAD 2100 Business and Economic Statistics (3 hours)

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. Topics include gathering, organizing, interpreting, and presenting data with emphasis on hypothesis testing as a method for decision making in the fields of business and economics. Procedures include z-tests, t-tests, ANOVAs, correlation, and simple regression.
Cross listed with ECON 2100.
Prerequisite(s): Demonstrated proficiency in high school algebra or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each semester.)

BUSAD 2300 Business Communication (3 hours)

This course will review the basics of effective oral and written communication and apply these basics to business writing and presentations. A variety of individual and collaborative projects, including memos, letters, and reports, will emphasize the process of drafting, revising, and editing business communications.
Prerequisite(s):  Business Administration, Accounting, Economics, International Business, or Sport Management major.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
BUSAD 2500 Principles of Management (3 hours)

An introduction to management theory and practice. Students explore the history of management and the environment in which managers operate. Classroom discussion focuses on the basic managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, and controlling.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
ECON 1540 Microeconomic Principles (3 hours)

An examination of the microeconomic theories, problems, and policies of the U.S. economy. Topics include the theory of the firm, market structures, and current economic issues such as income distribution, antitrust policy, poverty, the farm problem, and international trade.
Prerequisite(s): ECON 1530 Macroeconomic Principles strongly recommended.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
HHP 1700 Introduction to Sport Management and Leadership (3 hours)

This course is designed to provide current or future sport program administrators with an overview of the sport management discipline. The introduction is focused on the history of the sport management discipline, career opportunities, management principles, marketing, economics and finance, facility and event management, law, communications, and public relations. These principles are applied to various sport and exercise settings, such as interscholastic, intercollegiate, international, and professional sport along with the community recreation industries.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 1740 Sport in Society (2 hours)

Sport in Society course designed in taking global, issues-oriented approach to the study of the role of sport in society. This course encourages the discussion of current sport-related controversies and helps students develop critical thinking skills. This course also provides an analysis of social patterns of sport as these are shaped and maintained in social contexts. Structures and dynamics of sport can be viewed as an instruction that is closely linked with other institutions such as family, education, gender roles, and racial and socioeconomic patterns.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

HHP 2920 Sport Facility and Event Management (3 hours)

This course examines the sports industry in relation to facility design, facility maintenance and risk management of operating sporting and recreational facilities. Students are required to complete 20 hours of facility/event management experience.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
HHP 3210 Current Issues and Ethics in Sport (3 hours)

This is a course designed to introduce students to ethical theories and thinking through the analysis of major issues present in today’s sporting landscape. Students will be engaged in discussions of the past, current and future nature of sport and the issues that affect both sport and society in order to better understand the ethical dilemmas that face current and future sport managers/administrators, participants, health professionals, coaches, academics and consumers.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
HHP 3700 Sport Law and Governance (3 hours)

This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the U.S. legal system as presented and applied to contexts within the sport industry. Students will also be introduced to fundamental legal principles of significance to sport management. Students will analyze numerous cases and the legal concepts and analyses presented to gain a deeper understanding of legal issues in various coaching, governance, management, and sport participation scenarios.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
HHP 3730 Sports Marketing and Communication (3 hours)

This course will introduce students to the application of basic principles of marketing to the sport industry with an emphasis on intercollegiate athletics, professional sport and multisport club operations. The function of the course is threefold: 1) to provide students with a broad appreciation of marketing; 2) to provide students with an up-to-date understanding of marketing concepts as they are currently being applied in various sport management contexts; and 3) to provide a foundation for those students who plan to do advanced study and work in marketing, consumer behavior, and related fields.

Prerequisite(s): BUSAD 2000 Principles of Marketing or permission of instructor.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

HHP 3990 Professional Engagement (1 hour)

This class is designed to prepare students who are entering the professional field of health and human performance. Real-life, hands on tools for career advancement will be examined and then applied including the creation of goals and objectives, a personal statement, a cover letter, and a professional resume with references. An investigation into graduate schools (and the requirements for applying) or the job market for your intended career will be explored, as well as searching for alternative career paths. No Pass/Fail.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 4220 Sport Finance (3 hours)

This course examines the sports industry in relation to the principles of budget, finance, and economics. Students will gain an understanding of financial management within the sport context.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

HHP 4970 Internship (1-8 hours)

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student's major interest. Each student must work with the department internship coordinator to obtain an internship related to the specific area of emphasis or interest of the student. This position must satisfy the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student. This course presents each student the opportunity for work-related application of interest in the Health and Human Performance area.

No P/F.

Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and approval of the supervising faculty member.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
HHP 4990 Senior Capstone (1 hour)

This senior capstone class is the final course for a degree in the Health and Human Performance Department. In a capstone experience, students will reflect on your academic growth while finalizing a customized electronic portfolio. The ePortfolio will be used to review and reflect on previous work, carryout an assessment of their academic career, and project a future vision for an intended career in their chosen field. This ePortfolio can be used for future academic goals as well as to serve as an aid for housing acquired material. Prerequisites: Senior standing and Departmental major or permission of the instructor. No Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and a departmental major, or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester.)

MATH 1300 Statistics (3 hours)

An introduction to statistics concepts with an emphasis on applications. Topics include descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous probability distributions, the central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and linear regression.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
PSYCH 2100 Psychological Statistics (4 hours)

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics as decision-making guides in psychology and related fields. Topics include organization, analysis, presentation, and interpretation of data with emphasis on the hypothesis testing model of inference. Specific procedures include z-tests, t-tests, analysis of variance, and correlation. A laboratory section is required for computational experience.
Prerequisite(s): PSYCH 1010/PSYCH 1010FYW Introduction to Psychological Science and sophomore standing.
Recommended: College level mathematics course.
(Normally offered each semester.)

SOC 3930 Quantitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to quantitative research methods commonly used in social science research: survey research, experimental design, secondary analysis, and evaluation research. Emphasis is on survey research, including project design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data collection, statistical analysis, and formal presentation of results. Key elements of the course are learning to ask researchable questions and formulate testable hypotheses.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology and any Statistics course (SOC 2910 Social Statistics is preferred.)

Normally offered each fall semester.

SOC 3940 Qualitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to qualitative research methods commonly used in social science research. Emphasis is on individualized project design, project construction, data analysis, and formal presentation of results. Course content includes exploration of observation, participant observation, ethnography, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, content analysis, case study, and online qualitative innovations in research.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.

Normally offered each spring semester.