Health and Fitness Studies (B.S.)

Students majoring in Health and Fitness Studies may pursue interest in such areas as personal training, strength and conditioning training, worksite wellness, health promotions, fitness centers, and graduate school. See your advisor regarding possible career choices and graduate school requirements.

Learning Outcomes
Majors will be able to:

  1. Possess understanding of human anatomy, physiology, and biomechanics of movement and performance.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in assessing health, fitness, and well-being and prescribing programs to achieve goals in a safe and effective environment.
  3. Demonstrate practical application of knowledge and ethical decision making in an appropriately supervised organizational setting.
  4. Analyze and effectively communicate (oral and written) scholarly work in health and human performance.

 

Required Courses 44 hours
Health and Fitness Studies (54 hours)
BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIO 1090L Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 4 hours
BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II and BIO 1100L Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 4 hours
HHP 1270 Advanced Emergency Care 1 hour
HHP 1320 Introduction to Allied Health 1 hour
HHP 2010 Drugs in Modern Society 3 hours
HHP 2020 Consumer, Community, and Environment Health Issues 3 hours
HHP 2030 Human Sexuality 3 hours
HHP 2040 Stress and Disease Management 2 hours
HHP 2500 Basic Human Nutrition 2 hours
HHP 2850 Structural Kinesiology 1 hour
HHP 3100 Worksite Health Promotion 3 hours
HHP 3150 Principles Of Sport Performance 3 hours
HHP 3400 Advanced Human Nutrition 2 hours
HHP 3850 Biomechanics 3 hours
HHP 4150 Physiology of Exercise 4 hours
HHP 4250 Exercise Testing and Programming 3 hours
HHP 4970 Internship 2 hours
Select 8 hours from the following courses: 8 hours
 
Capstone Courses 2 hours
HHP 3990 Professional Engagement 1 hour
HHP 4990 Senior Capstone 1 hour

 

ATTR 2400 Physical Exam of the Lower Extremity (3 hours)

An in-depth study of the lower extremities including skills used to evaluate, treat and manage athletic injuries. Includes one 1-hour lab per week.
Prerequisite(s): Formal admission into ATP or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

ATTR 2410 Physical Exam of the Upper Extremity (3 hours)

An in-depth study of the upper extremities including skills used to evaluate, treat and manage athletic injuries. Includes one 1-hour lab per week.
Prerequisite(s): AT 2400 Physical Exam Of The Lower Extremity.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3 hours)

An introductory study of cellular physiology and tissues along with a comprehensive study of the integumentary skeletal, muscular, nervous systems, and special senses. Does not count toward a biology major.
Three lectures per week.
Pre or Corequisite(s): BIO 1090L Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

BIO 1090L Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory (1 hour)

Laboratory experiments and investigative exercises supporting BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
Pre or Corequisite(s): BIO 1090.

BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3 hours)

An introductory study of the blood, cardiovascular lymphatic, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems in addition to metabolism, fluid and electrolyte balance and acid-base balance of the body. Does not count toward a biology major.
Three Lectures per week.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I or permission of the instructor.
Pre or Corequisite(s): BIO 1100L Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

BIO 1100L Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (1 hour)

Laboratory experiments and investigative exercises supporting BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
Pre or Corequisite(s): BIO 1100.

HHP 1270 Advanced Emergency Care (1 hour)

A study and application of the principles and techniques involved in the advanced administration of first aid, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and automated electronic defibrillators (AEDs). Students will earn American Red Cross certifications. Cross listed with AT 1270.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 1300 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3 hours)

A study of injuries common to athletic participants and the prevention and care of such injuries. Cross listed with AT 1300.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 1320 Introduction to Allied Health (1 hour)

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of allied health. The course will explore careers in the allied health fields. Additionally, students will begin to develop the personal and professional skills needed to work in these fields.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 1400 Games and Activities I (2 hours)

The purpose of this course is to teach students the fundamental skills and basic rules for games and activities commonly played in physical education classes (baseball, basketball, football, soccer, volleyball). Additionally, students will learn about and participate in a few less-common games and activities that are popular throughout the world.

(Normally offered each fall semester).

HHP 1450 Games and Activities II (2 hours)

The purpose of this course is to teach students the fundamental skills and basic rules for games and activities commonly played in physical education classes (badminton, golf, pickleball, tennis, track and field). Additionally, students will learn about and participate in a few less-common games and activities that are popular throughout the world.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

HHP 1500 Introduction to Coaching Theory (2 hours)

A course designed to develop and expand information about coaching, coaching styles, and coaching strategies. The course will cover practical coaching theories and include information about organization, communication, and motivation.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

HHP 1910 Medical Terminology (1 hour)

This course focuses on the systematic approach to word building and term comprehension of medical terms. Includes definitions, spellings, pronunciations and common abbreviations of medical terms.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 2010 Drugs in Modern Society (3 hours)

A course designed to develop and expand information about the use and abuse of drugs including: alcohol, tobacco, depressants, stimulants, narcotics, inhalants, club drugs, date rape drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, sport enhancement drugs, prescription and OTC drugs. The course will include history of, and facts about the substances, the pharmacokinetic properties, the formation of laws, the victims, prevention, and approaches to treating the problem.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
HHP 2020 Consumer, Community, and Environment Health Issues (3 hours)

A course designed to develop and expand information about the environment, the informed health consumer, healthful aging and community health. The course will acquaint students with the process of aging, consumer protection, the environment, and community from a health perspective.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
HHP 2030 Human Sexuality (3 hours)

A course designed to develop and expand current information about human sexuality in a practical manner. The course will present facts and statistics about anatomy and physiology, gender, sexual orientation, reproduction, sexually transmitted infections, contraception, sexual growth and development, relationships and sexual communication, sexual health, commercialization of sex and sexual coercion.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
HHP 2040 Stress and Disease Management (2 hours)

A course designed to develop and expand information about stress, mental health, and major chronic diseases. The course will present causes and warning signs of major chronic diseases and coping strategies for emotional stress.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
HHP 2500 Basic Human Nutrition (2 hours)

This is a course designed to provide students with the basic scientific principles of nutrition focusing on their personal choices and experiences. The student will develop a definition of nutrition, and learn how nutrition has evolved. The student will be introduced to the concepts of: essential nutrient classifications, defining and developing a healthy diet, recommendations for specific nutrients, eating disorders, energy balance and obesity, body composition, lifetime nutrition (infancy to older adults), and food/beverage choices and the influence on chronic disease and optimal wellbeing.
(Normally offered each semester)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
HHP 2720 Introduction to Massage Therapy (3 hours)

This course is an introduction to the field of massage therapy in rehabilitation programs and personal wellness plans. The class will address local, national and global perspectives, current research, history and development in the field. Laboratory experiences with methods in wellness massage are emphasized.

(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
HHP 2760 Sport and Exercise Psychology (2 hours)

This course examines psychological theories and practices related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce you to the field of sport and exercise psychology by providing a broad overview of the major topics in the area.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 2800 Cardiac Rehabilitation (2 hours)

A course designed to introduce students to clinical exercise. This course will involve learning basic cardiovascular physiology, the phases of cardiac rehabilitation, and appropriate exercise and testing procedures. Introduction to interpreting electrocardiograms and case-study analyses are also included.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
(Offered as needed.)

HHP 2850 Structural Kinesiology (1 hour)

This course integrates musculoskeletal anatomy with human movement. Students will learn and apply musculoskeletal anatomy and joint actions to upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk movements.

Normally offered each semester.

HHP 2920 Sport Facility and Event Management (3 hours)

This course examines the sports industry in relation to facility design, facility maintenance and risk management of operating sporting and recreational facilities. Students are required to complete 20 hours of facility/event management experience.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
HHP 3100 Worksite Health Promotion (3 hours)

A course designed to introduce students to concepts and practices relating to worksite health promotion. Students will learn how to develop, implement, and evaluate wellness promotion programs. Students will complete a 20-hour field experience in an assigned worksite in the community to provide invaluable experience.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

HHP 3120 Motor Learning and Control (3 hours)

A course that will introduce students to current understandings of how complex motor skills are initially learned, and how they are controlled and refined with practice, from a behavioral point of view. A variety of activities will provide students with practical examples to deepen understanding. This course has applications to general exercise science, physical therapy, and coaching.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

HHP 3150 Principles Of Sport Performance (3 hours)

An advanced study of the scientific principles and theories related to sport performance in both the private and public sectors. Discussions related to applications and concepts in the exercise sciences, testing and evaluation, exercise technique, sport nutrition, exercise psychology, program design, and strength and conditioning administration and facility organization will be emphasized.

Normally offered each semester.

HHP 3400 Advanced Human Nutrition (2 hours)

This is a course designed to study foods and their effects upon health, development, and performance of the individual. The student will build on materials and knowledge learned from HHP 2500 Basic Human Nutrition. The student will be introduced to the concepts of: link between food and energy, proper water balance and electrolytes, science of supplementation, manipulation of macronutrient intake, nutrient timing, customized nutrition plans, and the key concepts of sport nutrition relative to both exercise and nutrition for optimal health and physical performance.

Prerequisite(s): HHP 2500 Basic Human Nutrition, BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I or BIO 3200 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I, BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II or BIO 3210 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II, or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered semester)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
HHP 3500 Elementary PE Methods (3 hours)

A course designed to instruct students on how to teach physical education to elementary students. Topics include curriculum development, planning, assessment, behavior management, modifications, and locomotor and object control skills. Students will have numerous opportunities to create and teach PE lessons to each other. For PE majors, a 20-hour practicum experience in a local elementary physical education class is required. For non-PE majors, a final project will be required.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.
(Normally offered every fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
HHP 3550 Health Methods (3 hours)

A course designed to instruct students on how to teach Health education in the school setting. This course will prepare students to teach standards-based Health to all grade levels. Topics include curriculum development, planning, CSPAP, assessment, and technology. Students will have numerous opportunities to create and teach Health lessons to each other. For Health and PE majors, a 10-hour practicum experience in a local school Health class is required. For non-majors, a final project will be required.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.
(Normally offered every fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
HHP 3600 Secondary PE Methods (3 hours)

A course designed to instruct students on how to teach physical education to middle and high school students. Topics include curriculum development, planning, assessment, behavior management, modifications, team sports, individual and lifetime activities, and technology. Students will have numerous opportunities to create and teach PE lessons to each other. For PE majors, a 20-hour practicum experience in a local middle or high school physical education class is required. For non-PE majors, a final project will be required.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of instructor.
(Normally offered every spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
HHP 3850 Biomechanics (3 hours)

This course integrates physics with human movement to provide understanding of human movement from a kinetic and kinematic perspective. Students will explore and apply these principles to a human movement or exercise of their choice. 
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I or BIO 3200 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
Normally offered each spring semester.

HHP 3990 Professional Engagement (1 hour)

This class is designed to prepare students who are entering the professional field of health and human performance. Real-life, hands on tools for career advancement will be examined and then applied including the creation of goals and objectives, a personal statement, a cover letter, and a professional resume with references. An investigation into graduate schools (and the requirements for applying) or the job market for your intended career will be explored, as well as searching for alternative career paths. No Pass/Fail.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 4150 Physiology of Exercise (4 hours)

This course explores the physiological effects and adaptations of exercise using a system approach. Students will be exposed to the latest research in the field that contributes to our understanding of how the human body is designed for exercise and movement. Practical application of these principles will be explored during class and throughout the laboratory experience.
One 1.5 hour lab per week.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II or BIO 3210 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II and junior standing.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 4250 Exercise Testing and Programming (3 hours)

This course provides students hands-on learning of the laboratory and field tests used for assessing physical fitness and body composition for health and performance. Test results are used in developing individualized exercise programming to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness, body weight and body composition, as well as flexibility.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II or BIO 3200 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I and junior standing.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 4800 Research and Statistical Methods (3 hours)

Research and Statistical Methods is designed for senior-level HHP majors to develop an understanding of the research process and the rationales for basic behavioral statistics in the field of exercise science. This class will focus on the creation of a research proposal for exercise science and on developing reading, writing, and practical skills to interpret and conduct research.

Prerequisite(s): HHP 1320 Introduction to Allied Health and junior standing, or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
HHP 4810 Senior Research (1 hour)

This course will focus on developing skills to conduct a research study, analyze results, and complete a research paper. Students will present their research proposal to recruit subjects, give an informal elevator speech regarding the state of their research project, and at the end of the course, formally present their research study at
the NWU Student Symposium.

Prerequisite(s): HHP 4800 Research and Statistical Methods.

(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
HHP 4970 Internship (1-8 hours)

An on-the-job experience oriented toward the student's major interest. The student is to secure a position in an organization that satisfies the mutual interests of the instructor, the sponsor, and the student. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours. No P/F.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing and approval of the supervising faculty member.

(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
HHP 4990 Senior Capstone (1 hour)

This senior capstone class is the final course for a degree in the Health and Human Performance Department. In a capstone experience, students will reflect on your academic growth while finalizing a customized electronic portfolio. The ePortfolio will be used to review and reflect on previous work, carryout an assessment of their academic career, and project a future vision for an intended career in their chosen field. This ePortfolio can be used for future academic goals as well as to serve as an aid for housing acquired material. Prerequisites: Senior standing and Departmental major or permission of the instructor. No Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and a departmental major, or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester.)