Exercise Science (Pre-AT) (B.S.)

The exercise science (pre-AT) major will set students up to pursue a Master of Athletic Training at NWU. This major differs from the exercise science major with a specific AT research course and AT clinical experiences.

The Master of Athletic Training two-year program will begin May 2025. This 3+2 program features three years in a relevant undergraduate degree followed by two years of master's study. This Exercise Science (Pre-AT) major is for students who have been accepted into the 3+2 Master of Athletic Training degree to allow students to finish an undergraduate Exercise Science major and transition into the graduate Athletic Training program during their final year of the undergraduate program.

Admission

The program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Exercise Science for students who have been formally admitted into the Master of Athletic Training program. Acceptance into the program is based on the admission material completed and submitted to the Program Director on or before January 15. To see all admissions requirements and to obtain admission materials, visit the Athletic Training Program page.

The Nebraska Wesleyan University Athletic Training program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education.

Mission Statement

The Athletic Training Program at Nebraska Wesleyan University prepares students for a career in athletic training by providing them the skills and knowledge to practice in a variety of settings while allowing opportunities for intellectual and personal growth within the framework of a liberal arts education.

Program Goals

NWU's Athletic Training Program will:

1. Provide students diverse classroom and clinical experiences that allow them to be active learners.

2. Prepare students to pass the BOC exam. (Our goal is to have at least an 80% first-time pass rate.)

3. Develop students who act as ethical and responsible athletic training professionals.

Learning Outcomes
Majors will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate mastery of the knowledge, skills and abilities required of an entry-level athletic trainer.
  2. Be prepared for employment in a variety of athletic training and healthcare settings.
  3. Employ skills and communication techniques appropriate for serving diverse patient populations.
  4. Recognize the importance of being involved in and network through professional organizations.
  5. Value ethical principles and behavior required of a healthcare professional.

 

ATTR 5010 Athletic Training Clinical Experience I (1 hour)

This course provides clinical experience supervised by a Clinical Preceptor in an athletic training setting. Emphasis will be placed on advanced first aid and CPR with AED, spine boarding, emergency action plan implementation, and heat and environmental related conditions (e.g. sudden illnesses, drug overdose, anaphylaxis, etc.).

ATTR 5020 Athletic Training Clinic Experience II (3 hours)

This course provides clinical experience supervised by a Clinical Preceptor in an athletic training setting. Emphasis will be placed on taping and wrapping of athletic injuries and protective equipment fitting and maintenance.

ATTR 5330 Health Assessment (4 hours)

This course will provide skills required to conduct a holistic health assessment through comprehensive analysis of a patient's health status across the age continuum. Topics include dermatological, cardiovascular, ear, nose and throat, neurological, respiratory, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, renal and urogenital, endocrine and metabolic systems, and psychological medical disorders.

ATTR 5330L Health Assessment Lab (1 hour)

This course will provide time to master hands on skills required to conduct a holistic health assessment through comprehensive analysis of a patient's health status across the age continuum.

ATTR 5400 Physical Examination of Lower Extremity (4 hours)

An in-depth study of the lower extremities including skills used to evaluate, treat and manage athletic injuries.

ATTR 5510 Research and Statistics Evidence-based Practice (2 hours)

This course provides an introduction to research and statistics including evidence-based practice.

BIO 1010 Perspectives in Biological Science (4 hours)

Designed for non-science majors, this general education course will examine the principles of biology within the context of the human experience and covers cell biology, physiology, genetics, evolution, ecology, and the interaction of humankind and the environment. Course content will be offered in a variety of formats including but not limited to: lectures in person or online; laboratory experience; group activities and discussion-based activities. Does not count toward a biology major.

(Normally offered at least once per academic year.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Natural Science Laboratory
BIO 3200 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I (3 hours)

This course is the first of a two-semester sequence anatomy and physiology for pre-health students that emphasizes the structure and function of the human body. It includes the study of homeostasis, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems in addition to the special senses.
Three lectures per week.
One 3-hour lab per week.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1110 Chemical Principles I and sophomore standing.
Corequisite(s): BIO 3200L Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

BIO 3200L Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I Lab (1 hour)

Laboratory experiments and investigative exercises supporting BIO 3200.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1110 Chemical Principles I and sophomore standing.

Corequisite(s): BIO 3200 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I.

Normally offered each fall semester.

BIO 3210 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II (3 hours)

Human Anatomy and Physiology is the study of structure and functions of the human body. This course will cover the topics of blood, the cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, renal and reproductive systems as well as nutrition and metabolism, acid-base, fluid, and electrolyte balance, and human development.
Three lectures per week.
One 3-hour lab per week.
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1110 Chemical Principles I and sophomore standing.

Corequisite(s): BIO 3210L Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

BIO 3210L Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II Lab (1 hour)

Laboratory experiments and investigative exercises supporting BIO 3210.

Prerequisite(s): CHEM 1110 Chemical Principles I and sophomore standing.

Corequisite(s): BIO 3210 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

CHEM 1110 Chemical Principles I (3 hours)

A study of fundamental principles of chemistry including structures of atoms and molecules, periodicity, stoichiometry, reactions, solutions, gases, and thermochemistry.
Three classes per week.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Natural Science Laboratory
CHEM 1110L Chemical Principles I Laboratory (1 hour)

Laboratory supporting CHEM 1110 Chemical Principles I.
One three-hour lab per week.
Pre or corequisite(s): CHEM 1110 Chemical Principles I.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Natural Science Laboratory
HHP 1270 Advanced Emergency Care (1 hour)

A study and application of the principles and techniques involved in the advanced administration of first aid, cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and automated electronic defibrillators (AEDs). Students will earn American Red Cross certifications. Cross listed with AT 1270.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 1320 Introduction to Allied Health (1 hour)

This course is designed to introduce students to the world of allied health. The course will explore careers in the allied health fields. Additionally, students will begin to develop the personal and professional skills needed to work in these fields.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 1910 Medical Terminology (1 hour)

This course focuses on the systematic approach to word building and term comprehension of medical terms. Includes definitions, spellings, pronunciations and common abbreviations of medical terms.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 2500 Basic Human Nutrition (2 hours)

This is a course designed to provide students with the basic scientific principles of nutrition focusing on their personal choices and experiences. The student will develop a definition of nutrition, and learn how nutrition has evolved. The student will be introduced to the concepts of: essential nutrient classifications, defining and developing a healthy diet, recommendations for specific nutrients, eating disorders, energy balance and obesity, body composition, lifetime nutrition (infancy to older adults), and food/beverage choices and the influence on chronic disease and optimal wellbeing.
(Normally offered each semester)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
HHP 2850 Structural Kinesiology (1 hour)

This course integrates musculoskeletal anatomy with human movement. Students will learn and apply musculoskeletal anatomy and joint actions to upper extremity, lower extremity, and trunk movements.

Normally offered each semester.

HHP 3850 Biomechanics (3 hours)

This course integrates physics with human movement to provide understanding of human movement from a kinetic and kinematic perspective. Students will explore and apply these principles to a human movement or exercise of their choice. 
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1090 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology I or BIO 3200 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I.
Normally offered each spring semester.

HHP 3990 Professional Engagement (1 hour)

This class is designed to prepare students who are entering the professional field of health and human performance. Real-life, hands on tools for career advancement will be examined and then applied including the creation of goals and objectives, a personal statement, a cover letter, and a professional resume with references. An investigation into graduate schools (and the requirements for applying) or the job market for your intended career will be explored, as well as searching for alternative career paths. No Pass/Fail.

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 4150 Physiology of Exercise (4 hours)

This course explores the physiological effects and adaptations of exercise using a system approach. Students will be exposed to the latest research in the field that contributes to our understanding of how the human body is designed for exercise and movement. Practical application of these principles will be explored during class and throughout the laboratory experience.
One 1.5 hour lab per week.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II or BIO 3210 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology II and junior standing.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 4250 Exercise Testing and Programming (3 hours)

This course provides students hands-on learning of the laboratory and field tests used for assessing physical fitness and body composition for health and performance. Test results are used in developing individualized exercise programming to improve cardiorespiratory fitness, muscular fitness, body weight and body composition, as well as flexibility.
Prerequisite(s): BIO 1100 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology II or BIO 3200 Advanced Human Anatomy and Physiology I and junior standing.
(Normally offered each semester.)

HHP 4990 Senior Capstone (1 hour)

This senior capstone class is the final course for a degree in the Health and Human Performance Department. In a capstone experience, students will reflect on your academic growth while finalizing a customized electronic portfolio. The ePortfolio will be used to review and reflect on previous work, carryout an assessment of their academic career, and project a future vision for an intended career in their chosen field. This ePortfolio can be used for future academic goals as well as to serve as an aid for housing acquired material. Prerequisites: Senior standing and Departmental major or permission of the instructor. No Pass/Fail.
Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and a departmental major, or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each semester.)

PHYS 1600 Principles of Physics I (4 hours)

The principles of classical mechanics, energy and motion designed for majors in the natural and health sciences. Algebra and trigonometry will be used in descriptions and problems.Three two-hour workshop sessions per week.Students may not receive credit for both PHYS 1600 and PHYS 2000 General Physics I.
Prerequisite(s): A grade of "C" or better in MATH 1470 Trigonometry or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus or MATH 1600 Calculus I or a MATH ACT score of 27 or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Natural Science Laboratory
PSYCH 1010 Introduction to Psychological Science (4 hours)

The Introduction to Psychological Science course will engage students in a learner-centered approach to the science of behavior and mental processes by synthesizing these areas of psychology: Scientific Inquiry, Biopsychology, Development, and Learning, Sociocultural Context, Individual Variations, and Applications of Psychological Science.
This is not a First Year Writing Course.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
PSYCH-1010FWY
PSYCH 1010FYW Introduction to Psychological Science (4 hours)

The Introduction to Psychological Science course will engage students in a learner-centered approach to the science of behavior and mental processes by synthesizing these areas of psychology: Scientific Inquiry, Biopsychology, Development, and Learning, Sociocultural Context, Individual Variations, and Applications of Psychological Science.
(Normally offered every fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: First-Year Curriculum: First-Year Writing
Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread