Mathematics (B.A., B.S.)

Academically equivalent, both bachelor of art and bachelor of science will fully prepare you for a career in mathematics. If you choose to graduate with two majors, and one major is only offered as a B.A. or B.S., the second major should match the first degree. Mathematics majors seeking an education endorsement will receive a B.S. degree.

Courses

34 hours
Mathematics Major (B.A. or B.S.**, 48-49 hours)
MATH 1600 Calculus I 5 hours
MATH 1610 Calculus II 5 hours
MATH 2200 Foundations of Modern Mathematics 3 hours
MATH 2600 Calculus III 4 hours
MATH 3200 Linear Algebra 3 hours
MATH 3300 Mathematical Statistics I 3 hours
MATH 3750 Numerical Analysis or
MATH 3700 Mathematical Modeling
3 hours
MATH 4200 Abstract Algebra I 4 hours
MATH 4300 Real Analysis 4 hours
Math Elective 3-4 hours

Select one of the following (may not use a course taken above as an elective):

 
Capstone 3 hours
MATH 4980 Mathematics Seminar 3 hours

Students seeking an education field endorsement in mathematics follow the above requirements with the following changes:

See the Nebraska Wesleyan University Department of Education for information regarding education courses required for teaching certification.

Required Supporting Program 8 hours
CMPSC 1100 Python Programming I 4 hours
CMPSC 2100 Python Programming II or DATA 1200 Excel and SQL Programming 4 hours

**A Mathematics major may earn either a B.A. or B.S. degree. However, if a student has a first major that is associated with a different baccalaureate degree, the Mathematics major may serve as a second major for the degree associated with the first major (B.FA., B.M., B.S.N.). 

CMPSC 1100 Python Programming I (4 hours)

An introduction to computational problem-solving using Python. Hands-on labs are used to motivate basic programming concepts, including basic data types and structures, functions, conditionals, and loops. Additional topics may include building and scraping HTML webpages. The course is recommended for all who wish to explore data science and/or computer science.

Prerequisite(s): Math ACT score of at least 21 or permission of instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
CMPSC 2100 Python Programming II (4 hours)

A project-based continuation of the techniques developed in CMPSC 1100 Python Programming I. Topics include object-oriented programming, algorithm design and analysis, data structures, and general problem-solving techniques (such as recursion) while following industry-standard software development principles.

Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in CMPSC 1100 Python Programming I or permission of instructor.

DATA 1200 Excel and SQL Programming (4 hours)

A study of managing, manipulating, and summarizing data using Excel and SQL. Topics in Excel include, but are not limited to: functions, filters, charts and visualizations, pivot tables, and macros. Topics in SQL include, but are not limited to: queries, joins, and basic database management.

EDUC 4870 Supervised Teaching in the Secondary School (7-14 hours)

Students work with one or more regular teachers in a secondary school. They attend the student teaching seminar and conference with their college supervisor as directed.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of preliminary student teaching requirements or approval of the department chair.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
MATH 1600 Calculus I (5 hours)

An introduction to calculus of a single variable. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, and beginning integration with applications. Assignments are given that help build proficiency in the use of a computer algebra system.
Prerequisite(s): Math ACT score of at least 27, or a grade of "C" or better in MATH 1470 Trigonometry or MATH 1400 Pre-Calculus, or permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
MATH 1610 Calculus II (5 hours)

A continuation of MATH 1600 Calculus I. Topics studied include integration techniques and applications, differential equations, numerical approximations, sequences and series, and vectors. Assignments are given that help build proficiency in the use of a computer algebra system.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair or grade of "C" or better in MATH 1600 Calculus I.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
MATH 2200 Foundations of Modern Mathematics (3 hours)

A course on the essential techniques of mathematical proof, such as case analysis, contradiction, and induction. Proofs will be written in the context of mathematical foundations (logic, sets, functions, etc.). Emphasis will be placed on developing the ability to write clear and precise arguments, which is useful for students in any major.

Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1600 Calculus I or permission of the instructor.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
MATH 2600 Calculus III (4 hours)

An introduction to multivariable calculus. Topics include vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and analysis. Assignments are given that help build proficiency in the use of a computer algebra system.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of department chair or grade of "C" or better in MATH 1610 Calculus II.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
MATH 3100 Differential Equations (4 hours)

A study of ordinary differential equations. Topics include first- and higher-order, linear and nonlinear differential equations with applications. Additional topics may be chosen from systems of differential equations, transform techniques, and numerical methods. Use will be made of a computer algebra system.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1610 Calculus II.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

MATH 3200 Linear Algebra (3 hours)

A study of vector spaces, determinants, linear transformations, matrices, matrix equations, and their applications in the natural and social sciences.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1610 Calculus II.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

MATH 3300 Mathematical Statistics I (3 hours)

An introduction to basic probability and statistics concepts with an emphasis on applications. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, Bayes' Theorem, discrete and continuous probability distributions, joint probability distributions, estimation and hypothesis testing.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1610 Calculus II.
(Normally offered fall of even-numbered years.)

MATH 3500 Geometry (3 hours)

Selected topics from Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry, geometry as a mathematical structure, and geometry as a study of invariants of set transformations.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2200 Foundations of Modern Mathematics.
(Normally offered fall of odd-numbered years.)

MATH 3700 Mathematical Modeling (3 hours)

A course that explores applications of mathematics to real-world problems. One or more topics may be chosen from the non-inclusive list: dynamical systems, linear programming, queueing theory, game theory, numerical analysis, wavelets, coding theory, and partial differential equations. Computer-based exercises will be a component of the course.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1610 Calculus II.

MATH 3750 Numerical Analysis (3 hours)

An introduction to the numerical approximation of solutions of various types of problems. Topics include root-finding, interpolation and numerical differentiation and integration. Additional topics may be drawn from numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations and linear systems.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 1610 Calculus II.
(Normally offered fall of odd-numbered years.)

MATH 4200 Abstract Algebra I (4 hours)

A study of various algebraic systems arising in modern mathematics, such as groups and rings.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2200 Foundations of Modern Mathematics.
(Normally offered fall of even-numbered years.)

MATH 4300 Real Analysis (4 hours)

A formal approach to limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration with emphasis on the proofs of theorems. Additional topics may include topology, uniform continuity, and uniform convergence.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C" or better in MATH 2200 Foundations of Modern Mathematics and MATH 1610 Calculus II.
(Normally offered spring of even-numbered years.)

MATH 4800 Research Experience (0-3 hours)

A guided, original research experience on a mathematical topic. This course will culminate in a conference-style presentation and written report. Students will keep a reflection journal throughout the experience.

Prerequisite(s): Instructor permission.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
MATH 4980 Mathematics Seminar (3 hours)

A study of topics of special interest in mathematics. Students begin the course by studying an advanced topic in mathematics. Students then work on individualized projects culminating in a symposium presentation and survey paper.
Prerequisite(s): Major in mathematics, senior standing, grade of "C" or better in either MATH 4200 Abstract Algebra I or MATH 4300 Real Analysis, and permission of the instructor.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive