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Engineering Professor, New York Times Best-Selling Author to Discuss Powerful Tools for Learning How to Learn

Barbara Oakley, professor of engineering at Oakland University, will deliver this year's Fetzer Science Lecture, which will provide participants with powerful mental tools to assist learning no matter your age or stage of life.
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Barbara Oakley, professor of engineering at Oakland University, will deliver this year's Fetzer Science Lecture, which will provide participants with powerful mental tools to assist learning no matter your age or stage of life.

Barbara Oakley didn’t begin learning remedial high school algebra until age 26. Now she’s a professor of engineering at Oakland University in Rochester, Mich., a New York Times best-selling author, and instructor of the world’s largest massive open online course, with over two million registered students.

How did this happen?

She learned how to learn. She will share her stories and intriguing insights on how you can change and grow no matter your age or stage of life when she presents the Fetzer Science Lecture on Friday, February 9. Her lecture titled, “Learning How to Learn: Powerful Mental Tools to Help You Master Tough Subjects,” begins at 7 p.m. in Olin B Lecture Hall, located one block east of 50th Street and St. Paul Ave.

Oakley’s work focuses on the complex relationship between neuroscience and social behavior. Her research has been described at revolutionary in the Wall Street Journal, and she has been awarded numerous teaching awards, including the American Society of Engineering Education’s Chester F. Carlson Award for technical innovation in engineering education. She is the New York Times best-selling author of “Mindshift” and has an upcoming book titled, “Learning How to Learn,” which is geared toward children.

The lecture is free and open to the public.

The Amos Fetzer and Alice Fetzer Memorial Lecture was established by Dr. W.R. Fetzer (1917) in memory of his parents. The lectureship is designed to bring to campus distinguished scholars in science, math, computer science, and the environment.