Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Prevention and Response

Nebraska Wesleyan University is committed to building a community free from all forms of discrimination and harassment. We seek an environment where students are free to achieve their greatest academic potential, and employees perform at their professional best.

Everyone who learns and works here must take responsibility to keep our community free from illegal discrimination based on sex or gender, including sexual harassment, sexual assault, stalking, sexual exploitation, and dating and domestic violence. These behaviors are prohibited at this university because they are antithetical to the learning, living and working environments we value.

Who to call if you are in immediate danger

Lincoln and Omaha 911

Lincoln
Campus Security, (402) 432-9238
On-Call Residential Education Coordinator, (402) 601-2114

Omaha
FNB Building Security, (402) 602-8912
Omaha Site Coordinator, (402) 827-3555


What is Title IX?

Title IX of the Education Amendments Act of 1972 is a federal law that states: "No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance."

Title IX prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities in federally funded schools. Title IX protects all students, employees, and other persons from all forms of sex discrimination.

What behavior constitutes a Title IX violation?

The 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations provide a clear distinction of prohibited conduct that falls within Title IX jurisdiction. Behavior that constitutes a Title IX violation is when:

  • The conduct occurs on university grounds or other property owned or controlled by the university;
  • The conduct occurs in the context of university employment or an education program or university-sponsored activity within the United States, including, but not limited to, school trips, research, on-line classes or meetings, or internship programs;
  • The university has substantial control over both the respondent and the context in which the sexual harassment or sexual misconduct occurs; or
  • The conduct occurs on property owned or in buildings controlled by any officially-recognized student organization.

Because the university works to maintain a community that is free from all forms of illegal discrimination based on sex or gender, sexual harassment and sexual misconduct that fall outside of Title IX may be addressed within the outside of Title IX policy and corresponding procedures. (See “What behavior constitutes sexual harassment and sexual misconduct outside of Title IX violation?”)

There are three types of misconduct that constitute Title IX:

  1. Quid pro quo harassment by any university employee;
  2. Any unwelcome conduct that a reasonable person would find so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it denies a person equal employment or educational access; and
  3. Any instance of sexual assault, as defined in the Clery Act, dating violence, or stalking, as defined in the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

Clery Act Definitions of Violence Against Women Act Crimes

Sexual assault is defined as any sexual act directed against another person, without consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

The university further defines a sexual act to include intentional contact with the intimate parts of another, causing another person to touch one’s intimate parts, disrobing, or exposure of intimate parts without consent. Intimate parts may include the breasts, genitals, buttocks, groin, mouth, or any other part of the body that is touched in a sexual manner. Sexual contact also includes vaginal or anal penetration, however slight, with a body part (e.g. penis, tongue, finger, hand, etc.) or object, or oral penetration involving mouth-to-genital contact.

Dating violence is defined as violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the harmed party. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

For the purposes of this definition:

  • Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
  • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Domestic violence is defined as a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by:

  • A current or former spouse or intimate partner of the harmed party;
  • A person with whom the harmed party shares a child in common;
  • A person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the harmed party as a spouse or intimate partner;
  • A person similarly situated to a spouse of the harmed party under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred;
  • Any other person against an adult or youth harmed party, who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Crime of violence is defined as an offense that has an element of the use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against the person or property of another, or any other offense that is a felony and that, by its nature, involves a substantial risk that physical force against the person or property of another may be used in the course of committing the offense.

Sexual harassment may also take the form of threats, assault, property damage, or violence or threat of violence to one's self, one's sexual or romantic partner, one’s family members or friends, or to the family members or friends of the sexual/romantic partner.

The university further includes emotional violence and emotional abuse as elements of sexual harassment within dating violence and domestic violence.

Emotional violence can be described as any act including confinement, isolation, verbal assault, humiliation, intimidation, infantilization, insults, threatens, degrades, controls, or any other treatment which may diminish the sense of identity, dignity, and self-worth.

Emotional abuse also known as mental or psychological abuse, encompasses many different tactics such as verbal abuse, playing mind games, attacking one’s character, threatening acts of violence in person, in writing, or electronically, against a person who is, or has been involved in, a sexual, dating, domestic, or other intimate relationship with that person.

Stalking is defined as engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:

  • Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
  • Suffer substantial emotional distress

For the purposes of this definition:

  • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property
  • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
  • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

The university’s definition of stalking further includes cyberstalking, in which electronic media such as the internet, social networks, blogs, cell phones, texts, or other similar devices or forms of contact are used to pursue, harass, or to make unwelcome contact with another person.

Sexual exploitation is sexual harassment that violates the sexual privacy of another, or takes sexual advantage of another without consent, constitutes unwelcome conduct that a reasonable person would find severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive.

Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:

  • Voyeurism – watching or taking pictures, videos, or audio recordings of another person in a state of undress or of another person engaging in a sexual act without the consent of all parties
  • Creating, disseminating, streaming, or posting pictures or video of another in a state of undress or of a sexual nature without the person’s consent
  • Exposing one’s genitals to another person without consent;
  • Trafficking of another individual;
  • Knowingly exposing another individual to a sexually transmitted infection without the other individual’s knowledge and consent; or
  • Inducing incapacitation or attempted incapacitation for the purpose of making another person vulnerable to non-consensual sexual activity.

Retaliation any act or attempt to seek retribution from any individual or group of individuals involved in the report, investigation, and/or resolution of a sexual harassment or sexual misconduct allegation. Retaliation can take many forms, including, but not limited to, continued abuse or violence, threats, exclusion, and intimidation. Any individual or group of individuals can engage in retaliation. Acts of Retaliation will be addressed under this policy and related procedures, just as a complaint of sexual harassment is handled.

Non-compliance with a No/Limited Contact Order
Failure to comply with the directives of a No/Limited Contact Order administered by the Title IX Office, will also be addressed as a separate violation of University policy.

What behavior constitutes a non-Title IX violation?

Sexual harassment and sexual misconduct are forms of discrimination and some forms of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct must be addressed under Federal Title IX Regulations. 

Because the University works to maintain a community that is free from all forms of illegal discrimination based on sex or gender, sexual harassment and sexual misconduct that fall outside of Title IX may be addressed within the outside of Title IX policy and corresponding procedures when it involves:

  • Current or former students as the complainant or the respondent; and/or
  • Current employees as the complainant or the respondent;

And when,

  • The conduct occurs off university grounds or on property not owned or controlled by the university; or
  • The conduct occurs outside of the context of university employment or an education program or university-sponsored activity and has an adverse effect for students and/or employees; or
  • The conduct occurs outside of the United States.

There are three types of misconduct that constitute sexual harassment outside of Title IX:

  1. Quid pro quo harassment;
  2. Any unwelcome conduct that a reasonable person would find severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive; and
  3. Any instance of sexual assault as defined in the Clery Act, dating violence, or stalking as defined in the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).

Clery Act Definitions of Violence Against Women Act Crimes

Sexual assault is any sexual act directed against another person, without consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

The university further defines a sexual act to include intentional contact with the intimate parts of another, causing another person to touch one’s intimate parts, disrobing, or exposure of intimate parts without consent. Intimate parts may include the breasts, genitals, buttocks, groin, mouth, or any other part of the body that is touched in a sexual manner. Sexual contact also includes vaginal or anal penetration, however slight, with a body part (e.g. penis, tongue, finger, hand, etc.) or object, or oral penetration involving mouth-to-genital contact.

Dating violence is defined as violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the harmed party. The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

For the purposes of this definition:

  • Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.
  • Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.

Domestic Violence is defined as a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by:

  • A current or former spouse or intimate partner of the harmed party;
  • A person with whom the harmed party shares a child in common;
  • A person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the harmed party as a spouse or intimate partner;
  • A person similarly situated to a spouse of the harmed party under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred;
  • Any other person against an adult or youth harmed party, who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred.

Crime of violence is an offense that has an element of the use, attempted use, or threatened use of physical force against the person or property of another, or any other offense that is a felony and that, by its nature, involves a substantial risk that physical force against the person or property of another may be used in the course of committing the offense.

Sexual harassment may also take the form of threats, assault, property damage, or violence or threat of violence to one's self, one's sexual or romantic partner, one’s family members or friends, or to the family members or friends of the sexual/romantic partner.

The university further includes emotional violence and emotional abuse as elements of sexual harassment within dating violence and domestic violence.

Emotional violence can be described as any act including confinement, isolation, verbal assault, humiliation, intimidation, infantilization, insults, threatens, degrades, controls, or any other treatment which may diminish the sense of identity, dignity, and self-worth.

Emotional abuse, also known as mental or psychological abuse, encompasses many different tactics such as verbal abuse, playing mind games, attacking one’s character, threatening acts of violence in person, in writing, or electronically, against a person who is, or has been involved in, a sexual, dating, domestic, or other intimate relationship with that person.

Stalking is defined as engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:

  • Fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others; or
  • Suffer substantial emotional distress

For the purposes of this definition:

  • Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person’s property.
  • Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.
  • Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

The university’s definition of stalking further includes cyberstalking, in which electronic media such as the internet, social networks, blogs, cell phones, texts, or other similar devices or forms of contact are used to pursue, harass, or to make unwelcome contact with another person.

Sexual exploitation is sexual harassment that violates the sexual privacy of another, or takes sexual advantage of another without consent, constitutes unwelcome conduct that a reasonable person would find severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive.

Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:

  • Voyeurism – watching or taking pictures, videos, or audio recordings of another person in a state of undress or of another person engaging in a sexual act without the consent of all parties;
  • Creating, disseminating, streaming, or posting pictures or video of another in a state of undress or of a sexual nature without the person’s consent;
  • Exposing one’s genitals to another person without consent;
  • Trafficking of another individual;
  • Knowingly exposing another individual to a sexually transmitted infection without the other individual’s knowledge and consent; or
  • Inducing incapacitation or attempted incapacitation for the purpose of making another person vulnerable to non-consensual sexual activity.

Retaliation any act or attempt to seek retribution from any individual or group of individuals involved in the report, investigation, and/or resolution of a sexual harassment or sexual misconduct allegation. Retaliation can take many forms, including, but not limited to, continued abuse or violence, threats, exclusion, and intimidation. Any individual or group of individuals can engage in retaliation. Acts of retaliation will be addressed under this policy and related procedures, just as a complaint of sexual harassment is handled.

Non-compliance with a No/Limited Contact Order
Failure to comply with the directives of a No/Limited Contact Order administered by the Title IX Office, will also be addressed as a separate violation of university policy.

What is consent?

Consent is an affirmative and willing agreement to engage in specific forms of sexual contact with another person. Consent requires an outward demonstration, through mutually understandable words or actions, indicating that an individual has freely chosen to engage in sexual contact. Consent cannot be obtained through the use of coercion or force or by taking advantage of the incapacitation of another individual.

Silence, passivity, or the absence of resistance does not constitute consent for sexual activity. If confusion or ambiguity arises during a sexual interaction, it is essential that each participant stop and clarify the other’s willingness to continue.

Consent can be withdrawn at any time. When consent is withdrawn, sexual activity must cease. Prior consent does not imply current or future consent; even in the context of an ongoing relationship, consent must be sought and freely given for each instance of sexual contact.

Consent is not present when there is sexual contact with someone who is known, or should have been known, to be incapacitated or otherwise mentally or physically incapable of resisting or appraising the nature of conduct. Likewise, consent is not present if the use of force or coercion of another person to engage in sexual contact against their will has occurred.

Coercion is the use of pressure to compel someone to initiate or continue sexual activity against their will. Coercion can include a wide range of behaviors, including intimidation, manipulation, threats, and blackmail. A person's words or conduct are sufficient to constitute coercion if they inhibit another individual's freedom of will and ability to choose whether or not to engage in sexual activity. 

Force is the use or threat of physical violence or intimidation to overcome an individual's freedom to choose whether or not to participate in sexual activity. There is no requirement that a party physically resists the sexual advance or request, but resistance will be viewed as a clear demonstration of non-consent. Incapacitation: the inability, temporarily or permanently, to give consent because the individual’s mental and/or physical ability is diminished, and/or the individual is asleep, unconscious, or unaware that sexual activity is occurring. A person who is incapacitated lacks the ability to make informed, rational judgments and cannot consent to sexual activity.

Incapacitation may result from the use of alcohol and/or drugs. The impact or impairment from alcohol and other drugs vary from person to person (e.g. vomiting, sleeping, blacking out, unconsciousness). Being intoxicated or impaired by drugs or alcohol is never an excuse for sexual assault or harassment in any form and does not diminish the responsibility to obtain informed and freely given consent.

What are my reporting options?

There are multiple channels for reporting sexual harassment and sexual misconduct. An individual may choose to report to the university, to law enforcement, to both, or neither. These reporting options are not exclusive. An individual may simultaneously pursue a criminal investigation and the university sexual harassment and sexual misconduct resolution process. The Title IX coordinator will support all parties involved in understanding and assessing all options. Questions should be directed to a Title IX coordinator.

Who to call if you are in immediate danger

Lincoln and Omaha 911

Lincoln
Campus Security, (402) 432-9238
On-Call Residential Education Coordinator, (402) 601-2114

Omaha
FNB Building Security, (402) 602-8912
Omaha Site Coordinator, (402) 827-3555

Reporting to the University

A report is kept private to the greatest extent possible while balancing the preferred course of action by the harmed party and the safety of the university. Other administers may become involved to facilitate supportive measures and accommodations requested.

  • Reporting to a Title IX coordinator – Nebraska Wesleyan University has two Title IX coordinators, each responding to specific members of the campus community. The coordinators oversee Nebraska Wesleyan University's processes regarding the review, investigation, and resolution of reports of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct. A report can be made at any time via email, phone, physical mail, or in person during regular business hours. The Head Title IX Coordinator, or designee, manages reports and complaints for faculty and staff. The Deputy Title IX Coordinator, or designee, manages reports and complaints for students.
    • Head Title IX Coordinator: Maria Harder, (402) 465-2117, mharder [at] nebrwesleyan.edu
    • Deputy Title IX Coordinator: Natasha Sutliff, Smith Curtis 325, (402) 432-6925, nsutliff [at] nebrwesleyan.edu or titleix [at] nebrwesleyan.edu
  • Reporting to a Campus Security Authority (CSA) employee – An employee or official designated by the university to have significant responsibilities over student and campus events and must report crimes that happen on campus, or on property owned or controlled by the university. Staff, faculty, and student workers can be identified as a CSA and alert others of their designation either in a course syllabus, or when the CSA believes they are about to receive a disclosure of sexual harassment or sexual misconduct. To learn more, see CSA Information
  • Reporting anonymously – Individuals may report sexual harassment and sexual misconduct concerns anonymously to the university through the university website by clicking on the link “Report a Concern, located at the bottom of every webpage. Please note, the university may be limited in its ability to respond to concerns reported anonymously.

Reporting to Law Enforcement

Individuals have the right to notify or decline to notify law enforcement. Police have legal authority to criminally investigate reports of sexual assault, domestic abuse, and stalking, collect evidence, make arrests, and assist in seeking emergency protective measures. In keeping with its commitment to take all appropriate steps to address and to prevent sexual harassment and sexual misconduct, the university encourages individuals to promptly report sexual harassment and sexual misconduct to preserve potential evidence. The university will assist individuals in notifying law enforcement if they choose to do so.

Lincoln Police Department Non-Emergency
(402) 441-6000

Lincoln Police Anonymous Reporting
(402) 441-3866

Omaha Police Department Non-Emergency
OPD Headquarter 24/7 or a precinct office Monday–Friday 8 a.m.–5 p.m.,  505 S. 15th Street, Omaha, NE 68102

Omaha Police Department Anonymous Forensic Exam
You may request that the nurse ask to keep your forensic exam anonymous.

Who are the Title IX coordinators at NWU and what is their role?

The Head Title IX coordinator, or designee, will manage reports and complaints for faculty and staff. The Deputy Title IX coordinator, or designee, will manage reports and complaints for students.

  • Head Title IX Coordinator
    Maria Harder
    Nebraska Wesleyan University, Smith Curtis 202E, 5000 Saint Paul Ave., Lincoln, NE 68504
    (402) 465-2117
    mharder [at] nebrwesleyan.edu
  • Deputy Title IX Coordinator
    Natasha Sutliff
    Nebraska Wesleyan University, Smith Curtis 325, 5000 Saint Paul Ave., Lincoln, NE 68504
    (402) 432-6925
    nsutliff [at] nebrwesleyan.edu or titleix [at] nebrwesleyan.edu

Title IX Coordinators Role and Responsibilities

  • Responsible for oversight of the assessment, investigation, and resolution of all reports of sexual harassment or sexual misconduct. These responsibilities include making the determination of whether the complaint regarding the alleged occurrence of sexual harassment or misconduct is within the definition of the Final Rule, or will be handled by the procedures governing alleged occurrences outside of the definition of the Final Rule.
  • To be knowledgeable and trained in relevant state and federal laws and university policy and procedures. Annual training includes, but is not limited to, the definition of sexual harassment, the scope of the university’s education program or activity, how to conduct an investigation and resolution process including hearings, appeals, and how to serve impartially, including to avoid prejudgment of the facts at issue, conflicts of interest, and bias. Moreover, any materials used to train Title IX coordinators, investigators, panel members, and decision-makers do not rely on sex stereotypes and promotes impartial investigations and adjudications of formal complaints of sexual harassment. Training materials will be made available soon on this website.
  • To be available to provide information to any individual, including a complainant, a respondent, or a third party, about the courses of action available at the university, both informally and formally;
  • To be available to assist any university community member regarding how to respond appropriately to reports of sexual harassment or sexual misconduct;
  • Responsible for oversight of sexual violence prevention education and employee training;
  • Responsible for monitoring full compliance with all requirements and timelines specified in the reporting and formal complaint procedures;
  • Responsible for ensuring resolution procedures are in compliance with federal and university policies and regulations;
  • Responsible for ensuring the timely completion of any remedies or sanctions, and;
  • Responsible for compiling annual reports. 
Where can I find help and resources?

Connect with a Confidential Resource

All Students and Employees
Campus Victim Advocate, advocate [at] nebrwesleyan.edu
University Minister, (402) 465-2222ebousson [at] nebrwesleyan.edu

Traditional Students
Counseling Services, (402) 465-2464counseling [at] nebrwesleyan.edu

Employees
Directions Employee Assistance Program, (402) 434-2900, directionseap [at] directionseap.com

Lincoln Community
Voice of Hope Crisis Line, (402) 475-7273

Omaha Community
Women’s Center For Advancement (WCA), (402) 345-7273, info [at] wcaomaha.org

Additional Resources

Campus Advocate Brochure
Advocacy is important. An advocate can provide you with information about your options and resources involving the harm you have experienced. Our Campus Advocate through Voices of Hope can give you confidential support, listen to your unique needs, and help you find ways to accomplish your goals. For more information about Voices of Hope Campus Advocate, click on the resource below:

Campus Security Authority FAQ
The university encourages all students and employees to report to a Title IX Coordinator when they receive a disclosure of sexual harassment or sexual misconduct to ensure harmed parties are aware of their rights, options, and resources. While all are encouraged, the University has identified a reporting structure that includes students and employees who are required to report disclosures they receive to a Title IX Coordinator due to their significant role with student and campus activities.

Medical Care and Evidence Collection
Survivors of sexual assault and intimate partner violence may choose to have a forensic examination to collect evidence. For more information on what all is involved with a forensic exam, how to help preserve evidence and other frequently asked questions, click on the resource below:

Resources and Contacts
You are not alone. There are resources available to you, both on- and off-campus. See the resource and contacts below:

Rights and Options
The following information provides a summary of rights and options following a report or a complaint of an alleged violation of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct policies. Please contact the Title IX Coordinator if you have any questions about this information.

Role of the Advisor of Choice
Someone who can advise you during the Title IX resolution process is referred to as the Advisor of Choice. The Advisor of Choice also cross-examines an involved party on behalf of the complainant or respondent they are advising. For more information on the Role of the Advisor of Choice, click the resource below:

 

Role of the Support Person
Someone who can support you during the Title IX and outside of Title IX resolution process is referred to as the Support Person. The Support Person may advise the person they are supporting, but cannot be actively involved in any of the proceedings. For more information on the Role of the Advisor of Choice, click the resource below:

Where can I find the faculty Title IX syllabus?

Title IX Syllabus
Each course syllabus should include a statement regarding sexual harassment and sexual misconduct being a violation of university policy and whether or not that faculty member is a Campus Security Authority required to report disclosures to a Title IX Coordinator. The suggested syllabus statement for the 2020-2021 Academic year is below:

How does the university resolve Title IX and non-Title IX formal complaints (Policies and Procedures)?

As a university that receives federal funds, Nebraska Wesleyan University must comply with the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations when addressing Title IX reports and complaints. In accordance to our core values as an institution, Nebraska Wesleyan University must also address sexual harassment and sexual misconduct that fall outside the jurisdiction of Federal Title IX Regulations through a separate policy and procedure. A Title IX coordinator will help determine which policy and procedures apply.

NWU offers both formal and informal resolution processes to resolve Title IX and outside of Title IX Formal Complaints. Below you will find NWU's sexual harassment and sexual misconduct policies and procedures for more information.

Policies

This policy applies to students and employees and addresses sexual harassment and sexual misconduct within the jurisdictions of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations:

Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy addressed under the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations (PDF)

This policy applies to students and employees and addresses sexual harassment and sexual misconduct outside the jurisdictions of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations:

Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct Policy Outside of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations (PDF)

Procedures

This procedure applies to students and employees and includes resolution procedures for addressing complaints of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct within the jurisdictions of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations:

Resolution Procedures for Addressing Complaints of Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct under the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations (PDF)

This procedure applies to only students and includes resolution procedures for addressing complaints of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct outside the jurisdictions of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations:

Resolution Procedures for Addressing Complaints of Student Sexual Harassment Sexual Misconduct Outside of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations (PDF)

This procedure applies when the respondent is an NWU staff employee and includes resolution procedures for addressing complaints of sexual harassment and sexual misconduct outside the jurisdictions of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations:

Resolution Procedures for Addressing Complaints of Sexual Harassment Sexual Misconduct Outside of the 2020 Final Rule for Federal Title IX Regulations when Staff Employees are the Respondent (PDF)

What can happen if someone violates Title IX or outside Title IX policy?

Sanctions will be determined based on the nature and severity of the policy violation(s) and in consideration for the safety of the campus community. Conduct history will also be considered as part of the sanctioning process. Possible sanctions may include, but are not limited to, protective measures, restrictions, letters of reprimand, action plans, performance improvement plans, apology letter, reflection statements, coaching, probation, suspension, expulsion, and/or separation.

Sanctions go into effect after the conclusion of, or following the deadline to submit, an appeal. The Title IX coordinator is responsible for ensuring the timely completion of any remedies or sanctions.

How can I get involved?

At NWU, students, staff, faculty, and community resources collaborate to prevent and respond to sexual and relationship violence.

Peer Educators are students who:

  • Plan and implement gender-based violence prevention programs approved by the Office of Violence Against Women and manage gender-based violence awareness efforts on social media
  • Strengthen partnerships between existing student organizations to promote gender-based violence prevention programs
  • Facilitate bringing in bystander training in person and virtually
  • Develop a strategic plan for a permanent Student Violence Prevention Council

Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response Team (GBVT)

In partnership with Title IX Staff members, the Gender-Based Violence Prevention and Response Team collaborates to support our Nebraska Wesleyan University community by directing sexual and relationship violence prevention, response, and survivor services.

  • Brandi Sestak, assistant dean for student success and residential education
  • Dani Jurgens, DOJ grant coordinator
  • James Ruzicka, director of the physical plant
  • Jamie K, Voices of Hope campus advocate
  • Janelle Andreini, assistant dean for student success and campus community
  • Sgt. Justin Armstrong, Lincoln Police Department
  • Kim Corner, director of counseling services
  • Maria Harder, assistant vice president of human resources and head Title IX coordinator
  • Morgan B, Voices of Hope advocate
  • Natasha Sutliff, deputy Title IX coordinator
  • Rachel Pokora, communication studies faculty and investigator
  • Rebecca Czaja-Stevens, social work faculty and investigator
  • Roxanne Styskal, assistant director of the physical plant
  • Sabrina Pinnix, residential education coordinator
  • Sarah Kelen, vice president of student life
  • Sue Gabriel, nursing faculty
  • Toni Jensen, social work faculty and investigator
  • Tyrone Bingham, academic advisor/Omaha instructional site coordinator
  • Wendy Hunt, director of diversity and inclusion

Contact our Department of Justice grant coordinator, Dani Jurgens at djurgens [at] nebrwesleyan.edu if you have a gender-based violence prevention and response discussion topic, or would like to become more involved in prevention and response efforts.

T-shirts hanging on a clothes line in front of the library with messages raising awareness to gender-based violence