Criminology (B.A., B.S.)

CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice (4 hours)

A survey course providing an overall view of the criminal justice system, the law, law enforcement, the courts, and corrections.

(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
CRIM 2110 Police And Society (4 hours)

This course provides an analysis of the structure-function of law enforcement and the dilemma confronting the police in relation with the community.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice.

(Normally offered alternate years.)

CRIM 2120 Criminal Law (4 hours)

Survey of criminal law with emphasis on basic legal procedure developed by the courts and legal problems of law enforcement.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice.

(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
CRIM 2130 Corrections (4 hours)

Analysis of the history, theory, structure, and function of contemporary penal institutions.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice.

(Normally offered every third spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
CRIM 2140 Juvenile Justice (4 hours)

This course examines the unique framework and workings of the juvenile justice system. This system is in the process of on-going profound changes in both legal rights and corrections. We will examine the reasons why juveniles commit crimes and status offenses. The current issues in juvenile justice such as: gangs, growth in "female" criminal involvement, and the hardening of juvenile offenders are also considered.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice.

(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Identity Thread
CRIM 2210 Probation and Parole (4 hours)

This course explores the types of probation and parole, the demand for probation and parole, the advantages and disadvantages of probation and parole, the job duties and qualifications necessary for probation and parole officers, and how probation and parole is integrated into the criminal justice system.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
CRIM 2300 Current Issues: Gangs And Gang Culture (3 hours)

Gangs and gang culture is a cutting edge course that explores what gang culture is like, how and why youth join gangs, how hard is it to exit gangs, how the gang culture affects youth and youth decision making, the most effective and least effective ways to combat the growth of gangs, and how communities have failed or been effective at halting gangs.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice.

CRIM 3130 Law and Society (4 hours)

This course offers an integrated overview of the complex interplay of the shifting realms of law and society. We depart from an analysis of the law as a set of social institutions, a construction of particular historical, cultural, economic and political conditions. We then interrogate the ways that social structures, including race, class, gender, sexuality, and nationality, as well capitalism, modernity and patriarchy influence the construction of law and legal doctrines. In turn, we explore how the resulting definitions of normativity and deviance, social control and liberty, as well as rights and freedoms serve to feed difference, inequality and injustice in society. But while law is often viewed as the realm of status quo and oppression, it is also often mobilized by laypersons, social movements, cause lawyers and public litigants to affect social change. Therefore, in this course, we investigate the complex relationship between law, social control and social change, delving into some of the most transformative moments of American law, and society, simultaneously.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.

CRIM 3150 Criminology (4 hours)

This course offers an examination of contemporary problems in crime and delinquency with emphasis upon the theories of deviant behavior and correction.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice and SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.

(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Justice Thread
CRIM 3400 Applied Criminal Justice: Prison Outreach (1 hours)

Students teach Criminal Justice courses to inmates at the State Penitentiary. The students will apply and expand their understanding of Criminal Justice by teaching inmates criminal justice concepts. The topics covered in a given semester vary but can include material typically found in courses like: Introduction to Criminal Justice, Crime and Delinquency, and Criminal Law. Under the guidance of the course instructor, students prepare and deliver lessons directly to inmates in their capacity as non-matriculated adult learners. In preparation of their time in the prison setting, students organize the curriculum, research the concepts, and prepare a lesson plan for teaching the concepts. Students then present the concepts, assess how that teaching process went for them and for the inmates, and finally, test the inmates on the level of learning of those concepts. May be repeated for credit.

Prerequisite(s): CRIM 1010 Introduction To Criminal Justice and permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
CRIM 3800 Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Project I (4 hours)

The Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Project (JRMP) is an experiential learning course that seeks to assist youth transitioning back to the community from a congregate care setting. The program matches undergraduate student mentors with youth in the juvenile justice system. Students will receive professional skill development through classroom instruction and experience working directly with the youth and juvenile justice system professionals. Students must commit one calendar year to the match and enroll in two consecutive semesters (CRIM 3800 and CRIM 3810). Junior or senior level standing preferred.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
CRIM 3810 Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Project II (4 hours)

The Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Project (JRMP) is an experiential learning course that seeks to assist youth transitioning back to the community from a congregate care setting. The program matches undergraduate student mentors with youth in the juvenile justice system. Students will receive professional skill development through classroom instruction and experience working directly with the youth and juvenile justice system professionals. Students must commit one calendar year to the match and enroll in two consecutive semesters (CRIM 3800 and CRIM 3810). Junior or senior level standing preferred.

Prerequisite: CRIM 3800 Juvenile Reentry Mentoring Project I and permission of the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology (4 hours)

This course is an introduction to using the sociological perspective as a method of social inquiry. Students explore such basic concepts as culture, socialization, social structure, social interaction, and social change. They study and apply the theories and research methodologies used to investigate human social interaction. These concepts are applied to social topics such as race, class, gender, family, crime, population, environment, and others.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Scientific Investigations: Social Science
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
SOC 1330 Race Relations and Minority Groups (4 hours)

See SOC 2330 Race Relations and Minority Groups.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: UC Reflected Self Thread
SOC 1350 Sociology of the Family (4 hours)

See SOC 2350 Sociology of the Family.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2350 Sociology of the Family (4 hours)

This course offers an analysis of various interrelationships of men and women with emphasis on love, courtship, marriage, and family. Institutional, social, and policy perspectives are presented in a cross-cultural and historical frame of reference to clarify the dynamic relationship between the family, its members, and broader U.S. society. The requirements of the 2350 course are the same as the 1350 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a field interview project that involves significant writing and which fulfills the writing instructive designation of Archway.
(Normally offered each semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2380 Women and Crime (4 hours)

See SOC 3380 Women and Crime.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 2910 Social Statistics (4 hours)

In this course students are introduced to descriptive and inferential statistics and their applications to sociological research. Statistical procedures include central tendency measures, variability, t-test, one-way ANOVA, correlation, regression, and chi square. The course also includes specific training in using SPSS for analysis.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Mathematical Problem Solving
SOC 3210 Thinking SocioLogically: Environment (2 hours)

This course is part of the Thinking SocioLogically cluster and is centered on reading, discussing and critically analyzing a wide variety of perspectives on the environment, using environmental sociology as a touchstone for synthesis. The topics range across classical and key debates. Students are encouraged to develop a personal environmental ethic to help frame their personal life choices and societal engagement.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Humans in the Natural Environment Thread
SOC 3220 Thinking SocioLogically: Medical Sociology (2 hours)

This course explores sociological dimensions of health, disease, illness, and the organization/delivery of health care. Challenging the notion that health outcomes are the product of "personal choices" alone, it allows students to investigate the impact of social forces on human health behaviors and outcomes.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Human Health and Disease Thread
SOC 3230 Thinking SocioLogically: Race/Ethnicity (2 hours)

This course focuses on social privilege and its impact on the meaning and significance of race and ethnicity. It features strong student involvement focused on emerging community issues. Responsibility for classroom activity will be shared by students and instructor. Potential topics covered include such things as minority group-specific studies, white privilege, racism, and intersectional analysis of social identities. This course also serves as a capstone for the American Minority Studies minor.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
SOC 3240 Thinking SocioLogically: Sociology Of Religion (2 hours)

This course introduces students to the scientific study of religion using the theories and methods of sociology. It explores classical and contemporary ideas about the role and functions of religion in societies. It allows students to explore current patterns in religious behavior and belief, religious diversity and inequality, and sources of religious data.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology

Normally offered in alternate years.

SOC 3250 Thinking SocioLogically: Work (2 hours)

This course explores work and occupations through a sociological lens, conceptualizing work as a social construction and a structural reality. Students will explore major topics and conceptual frameworks in the Sociology of works such as classical and contemporary theories, occupations, labor unions, work and social inequality, gendered labor markets, work and family, the changing workforce and contemporary issues of work.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology

SOC 3260 Thinking SocioLogically: Gender (2 hours)

This course uses the sociological perspective to explore sex and gender relations as major features of social life. It considers the social construction of gender (including the creation of masculinities and femininities) and examines the impact of gender ideologies on the social positions of gendered individuals. In particular, it emphasizes the way these social positions (such as gender, race, social class, sexualities, etc...) create and perpetuate the inequalities embedded in its social institutions (like the family, economy/work, religion, media, etc...).

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 3370 Social Inequality (4 hours)

This course explores social stratification, the socially created pattern of unequal distribution of social resources that leads to social inequality. It gives particular attention to social class, but also considers how class intersects with other social categories (such as race/ethnicity and gender) to create even further inequality. It also examines the interconnectedness of social inequality and the primary social institutions of U.S. society. It also explores global social inequality. The requirements of the 4370 course will be the same as the 3370 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number will select additional in-depth readings, writings, and activities that expand on the course materials.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Justice Thread
SOC 3380 Women and Crime (4 hours)

This course uses a sociological perspective to explore gendered issues that women face as perpetrators, victims, and workers in the criminal justice system. As such, students will explore theories and empirical studies related to offending, victimization, and employment. This course is cross listed with GEND 3380 and meets with SOC 2380/GEND 2380. The requirements of the 3380 course will be the same as the 2380 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number conduct an additional major project as determined by the instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
SOC 3540 Urban Communities (4 hours)

See SOC 4540 Urban Communities.

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
SOC 3920 Social Theory (4 hours)

This course explores a broad overview of big ideas about humans, society, change, stability, and chaos that have influenced sociology and other social sciences in the 19th to early 21st centuries. Broad perspectives examined include: Marxism, Functionalism, Weberian rationalization, Symbolic Interactionism, Feminisms, Queer Theory, Critical Theory, Critical Race Theory, Rational Choice, Postmodernism and Poststructuralism, and theories of globalization. This course builds critical thinking, analysis, application, and writing skills essential to majors, minors, and students interested in critically examining society.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
SOC 3930 Quantitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to quantitative research methods commonly used in social science research: survey research, experimental design, secondary analysis, and evaluation research. Emphasis is on survey research, including project design, questionnaire construction, sampling, data collection, statistical analysis, and formal presentation of results. Key elements of the course are learning to ask researchable questions and formulate testable hypotheses.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology and any Statistics course (SOC 2910 Social Statistics is preferred.)

Normally offered each fall semester.

SOC 3940 Qualitative Research Methods (4 hours)

In this course, students are introduced to qualitative research methods commonly used in social science research. Emphasis is on individualized project design, project construction, data analysis, and formal presentation of results. Course content includes exploration of observation, participant observation, ethnography, in-depth interviewing, focus groups, content analysis, case study, and online qualitative innovations in research.

Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.

Normally offered each spring semester.

SOC 4540 Urban Communities (4 hours)

This course examines urban communities and their historical roots. Topics covered include demographic and ecological trends, cross-cultural variations, and current theories about urban processes and community in order to foster an understanding of this dominant form of human social organization. Students engage in field study in areas such as community development, urban administration, spatial organization, and contemporary social problems. The requirements of the 4540 course are the same as the 3540 course EXCEPT that students in the higher course number complete a semester-length field project relevant to the course material.
Prerequisite(s): SOC 1110 Introduction to Sociology.
(Normally offered alternate years.)

Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Power Thread
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
SOC 4970 Internship (1-8 hours)

This course is a field placement at an agency/organization that is related to the student's area of career interest. Substantial field contact hours and regular meetings with instructor are required. The course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 credit hours. No Pass/Fail. Cross listed with CRIM 4970.
Prerequisite(s): Approval of the instructor.
(Normally offered every year.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
SOC 4980 Senior Seminar (1 hour)

This seminar enables Sociology-Anthropology, Criminology, and Business-Sociology majors to work collaboratively, to reflect upon and showcase cumulative
disciplinary learning and experiences, skills, and ethics, and to develop individual professional selves.  Students meet weekly to share internship and thesis experiences, develop public speaking skills, reflect upon cumulative learning, and develop a professional portfolio.  The seminar culminates in an Ignite or Pecha Kucha
presentation (or a Pecha Kucha film) at a departmental showcase. 

Prerequisite(s):  Permission of the instructor.
Normally offered every fall semester.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive