Theatre Design and Technology (B.F.A.)

This BFA program develops your technical and design skills through experiences in the classroom and performance laboratory.

As you acquire skills and knowledge through classroom and practical experiences, you will progress to supervised design application.

In recent years, our BFA students have participated in an average of six productions per year. Theatre design and technology majors benefit from the wealth of opportunities available through Nebraska Wesleyan's active production schedule.

We also encourage design and technical majors to work closely with faculty as members of the production team and in stage management.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Core 30 hours
Theatre Design and Technology Major (B.F.A., 82 hours)
THTRE 1020 Script Analysis 3 hours
THTRE 1300 Acting I 3 hours
THTRE 2500 Directing I 3 hours
THTRE 2700 Approaching Scenography 3 hours
THTRE 3500 Directing II 3 hours
THTRE 3800 World Theatre History I 3 hours
THTRE 3810 World Theatre History II 3 hours
THTRE 4480 Professional Preparation for Theatre 3 hours
Select 6 hours of Dramatic Literature: 6 hours
Design and Technology Core 42 hours
THTRE 1400 Stagecraft 3 hours
THTRE 1410 Costume Construction 3 hours
THTRE 2160 Stage Management 3 hours
THTRE 2710 Scenographic Techniques 3 hours
THTRE 3190 History of Period Style 3 hours
THTRE 3700 Scenography I 3 hours
THTRE 3710 Scenography II 3 hours
THTRE 4700 Scenography III 3 hours
THTRE 4710 Scenography IV 3 hours
ART 1050 Basic Design 3 hours
ART 1300 Drawing 1 3 hours
Art History course 3 hours
Studio Art or Art elective courses 6 hours
Theatre Electives  7 hours
Capstone 3 hours
THTRE 4970 Internship or
THTRE 4990 Senior Theatre Project
 

 

ART 1050 Basic Design (3 hours)

This course gives students a working comprehension of the elements and principles of design in a variety of media.  Students are expected to develop a strong studio work ethic, increase creative problem-solving capabilities, and discover ways to communicate ideas visually.  Students learn through making, self-reflection, and critique to develop a verbal/visual vocabulary that forms the foundation for the future study of art.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
ART 1300 Drawing 1 (3 hours)

An introduction to drawing by surveying its use as a foundation for future study in all 2D and 3D media. Various levels (1-4) of this studio art medium may meet together. The course requirements of each level are different.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
ENG 3000 Shakespeare (4 hours)

A systematic study of the outstanding literary artist of the English language: comedies, tragedies, and historical plays.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing, ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies or THTRE 1020 Script Analysis and Junior standing.
(Normally offered spring of odd-numbered years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
ENG 3260 Greek Drama (3 hours)

In this course, students will read a selection of plays by ancient Greek playrights: the comedies of Aristophanes and the tragedies of Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles. For a semester project, students will work as a collaborative team to write and perform a dramatic work (along with related documents) to demonstrate their understanding of the genre, period, and culture.
Cross listed with THTRE 3260.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and Junior Standing.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
HIST 3220 The Ancient World (4 hours)

See HIST 4220 The Ancient World.

THTRE 1020 Script Analysis (3 hours)

This is a fundamental course in the systematic analysis of dramatic texts. It is designed to equip theatre arts majors and minors with the textual expertise and vocabulary needed for academic discussion and artistic collaboration. Students will read and research a series of scripts in order to investigate the process in which a play develops from page to performance. Emphasis will also be given to how directors, designers, performers, and spectators individually and collaboratively engage with and utilize a dramatic text during each phase of the pre-rehearsal, rehearsal, and performance process.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

THTRE 1300 Acting I (3 hours)

This introductory acting course focuses on building physical, vocal, intellectual, and intuitive foundations for actors. Through discovery exercises, students increase their awareness of the fundamentals of contemporary acting and apply these concepts to monologue and scene work.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
THTRE 1400 Stagecraft (3 hours)

A course introducing students to all technical aspects of theatre production including scenery, properties, lighting, sound, makeup, and costuming. Particular emphasis is placed on practical knowledge of scenery, property construction techniques, and the materials used. Students must participate in a laboratory theatre experience.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
THTRE 1410 Costume Construction (3 hours)

The introductory course in costuming for the theatre. It presents the uses of fabrics, textures, colors, plastics, and other materials as well as developing the sewing techniques needed for the theatre.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
THTRE 2000 Play Reading (1 hour)

Play reading is a course that focuses on the reading, discussion, and interpretation of dramatic texts. Its aim is to provide a concentrated study of both content and form of selected texts in an effort to broaden knowledge of dramatic techniques genre, and strategies for interpretation. Dramatic texts will vary each semester with the goal that students will gain knowledge of a large quantity of plays during a four-year period. This course may be repeated for credit up to eight times for Theatre Arts majors and up to three times for Theatre Arts minors.

THTRE 2010 Dramatic Literature: Pulitzer Prize (2 hours)

The Pulitzer Prizes are regarded as one of the most prestigious awards that a writer or composer can win. The Pulitzer Prize in Drama is awarded "for a distinguished play by an American author, preferably original in its source, and dealing with American life". Given the emphases on American authorship and American life, this speaking-instructive dramatic literature course examines Pulitzer Prize winning plays such as Angels in America, The Kentucky Cycle, Topdog/Underdog, Disgraced and others to investigate questions about the features of a democracy and what it means to be a citizen of a democracy. The plays also serve as the basis for a series of oral presentations. The course also asks: To what extent is the representation of democratic principles and ideas a contributing factor in what plays win the Pulitzer Prize in Drama.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2020 Dramatic Literature: Tony Awards (2 hours)

Dating from 1947, the American Theatre Wing's Tony Awards have been presented annually to honor excellence in commercial theatre on Broadway. It is a high honor for a writer or composer to win the award for Best Play or Best Musical, and usually results in financial and career gains. This speaking instructive dramatic literature course examines this U.S. awards tradition, considering how the procedural structures incorporate elements of democratic ideals and principles. Students will read examples of Tony Award winning plays and musicals in order to consider how democratic ideals are represented in those plays and will consider whether such representation is contributing factor in what works with the awards. The plays also serve as the basis for a series of oral presentations.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2030 Dramatic Literature: American Comedy (2 hours)

Is nurturing the subversive comic impulse in expression vital to a democracy? This speaking-instructive dramatic literature course examines the comic tradition in U.S. dramatic writing, focusing primarily on how democratic principles and ideals have been represented. One primary topic to be considered involves the ways that comic plays, whether overtly or subversively, can serve as a contributing factor to stimulate political change in a democracy. A range of plays from early national to contemporary will be read and discussed to draw conclusions about features of a democracy and what it means to be a citizen of a democracy. The plays will also serve as the basis for oral presentations.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2040 Dramatic Literature: Families (2 hours)

This speaking-instructive dramatic literature course examines how definitions and concepts of family have been represented in dramatic literary works. By reading, discussing, reflecting in writing and making oral presentations about a variety of dramatic works drawn from diverse perspectives students will consider how changes in cultural and institutional environments impact definitions of family and how concepts of family are interconnected with other with other social institutions.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
THTRE 2050 Dramatic Literature: Gender and Sexuality (2 hours)

This speaking-instructive dramatic literature class examines how varieties of feminisms and cultural diversity have been represented in dramatic literary works. By reading, discussion, reflecting in writing and making oral presentations about a variety of dramatic works drawn from diverse perspectives students will utilize recent scholarship in gender and sexuality studies to analyze how assumptions about gender and/or sexualities have contributed to inequalities, choices, biases, oppression and/or empowerment in the culture and time periods in which the plays were written and produced.
Cross listed with GEND 2050.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
THTRE 2060 Dramatic Literature: Banned and Censored (2 hours)

Why does censorship occur in democracies that champion freedom of expression as an ideal? What are the tipping points that trigger the impulse to ban and/or censor? Does censorship or the threat of censorship present an obstacle to full participation of writers and readers in a democracy? Students seek the answers to these and other questions in this speaking-instructive dramatic literature course by looking at example of dramatic works that have been banned or censored in democratic nations. The selected texts will also serve as the basis for a series of oral presentations and will be utilized to discuss how the defining features of a democracy and the meaning of what it means to be a citizen in a democracy are represented in dramatic texts, as well as the broader question of how the arts shape how a nation defines itself as a democracy.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2110 Masterpieces of Dramatic Literature (3 hours)

Masterpieces of Dramatic Literature is an introductory course designed to provide a historical perspective on the literary record of human interactions with nature, the supernatural, and other humans. Utilizing dramatic texts selected from a range of cultures, genres, and time periods (including core readings from Greek or Roman classical literature, the Bible, Shakespeare, non-Western literature, literature by women, and literature by writers of color), students will devise strategies for reading, discussing, and writing about dramatic literature. These strategies will include consideration of biographical materials, cultural contexts and analysis of the functions of drama and theatre, in particular historical and geographical circumstances. Students will also be asked to consider how texts come to be valued as masterpieces, and the politics involved in such valuation.

THTRE 2160 Stage Management (3 hours)

Stage Management is an introductory course in production management. Students will be introduced to the basic guidelines and techniques for stage managing theatre productions including: communication skills, collaboration skills, rehearsal management, assembling the stage manager's cue and production book, and tech rehearsal/production run management. Students will also learn about professional stage management and Equity rules, guidelines, and membership, It is anticipated that each class member will serve as a stage manager for a university production and submit a detailed cue and production book.
(Normally offered every spring semester.)

THTRE 2500 Directing I (3 hours)

A study of the theories and techniques of directing. Students will direct several short scenes.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 1020 Script Analysis.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
THTRE 2700 Approaching Scenography (3 hours)

This is an introductory course in the theory and practice of scenography for the theatre. The primary goal of this class is to provide access to terms, concepts, and design principle applications for theatrical scenery, costume, and lighting design.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

THTRE 2710 Scenographic Techniques (3 hours)

An introduction to the basic tools and techniques of creating scenographic design documents and models for the theatre. Technical documents of ground plans, sections, elevations and lighting plots will be explored using CAD. Costume and set rendering will be explored using traditional and computer methods. Model making will be explored using both traditional and computer assisted methods.

THTRE 3000 Shakespeare (4 hours)

See ENG 3000 Shakespeare.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
THTRE 3190 History of Period Style (3 hours)

History of Period Style is a class for theatre performers, directors, designers and generalists, who wish to have a basis of knowledge about the major historical periods in Western Civilization that are the setting for the majority of plays in the western canon. This course will be an overview of the most important innovations in architecture, art, costume, furniture and decorative arts, and music for each period, as they influence theatrical production.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

THTRE 3260 Greek Drama (3 hours)

See ENG 3260 Greek Drama.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
THTRE 3500 Directing II (3 hours)

Students will direct under supervision a one-act play or (with instructor's permission) a full-length play. This course may be repeated.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 2500 Directing I.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
THTRE 3700 Scenography I (3 hours)

An introductory design studio course focusing on scenery, costume, and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the visual world of a number of dramas, comedies, or musicals creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings, and drafting. The course also emphasizes script analysis and visual research in the design process. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 1020 Script Analysis, THTRE 2700 Approaching Scenography, and THTRE 2710 Scenographic Techniques or permission of the instructor.

THTRE 3710 Scenography II (3 hours)

An intermediate design studio course focusing on scenery, costume and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the visual world of a number of moderate size dramas, comedies or musicals from contemporary and historical periods, creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings and drafting. The course also emphasizes script analysis and visual research in the design process. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 3700 Scenography I.

THTRE 3800 World Theatre History I (3 hours)

An integral factor in the study of the history of theatre is the impact that governments, democratic or otherwise, have on the development and sustenance of the arts. World Theatre History I is a Writing-Instructive course that covers early theatre through the Renaissance, so will investigate principles and ideals of Athenian democracy associated with Classical Greece, republican Rome, and the Italian republics of the early Renaissance, as well as more authoritarian forms of rule in early civilizations in India, China, Japan, and Meso-America.  Key questions will include: In what ways are artistic freedoms and practices linked to structures of governance?  How has theatre over time been a force for political change? Why does theatre flourish in some democracies (and in some authoritarian governments) and not in others? 
Prerequisite(s): POLSC 1000/POLSC 1000FYW United States Government and Politics or THTRE 1010 Theatre Appreciation or THTRE 1020 Script Analysis.
(Normally offered on even fall semesters.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 3810 World Theatre History II (3 hours)

An integral factor in the study of the history of theatre is the impact that governments, democratic or otherwise, have on the development and sustenance of the arts. World Theatre History II is a Writing-Instructive and Diversity-Global Instructive course that covers the span from late 17th C through present day, so will investigate the Age of Reason and the movement toward representative democracy as well as contemporary developments. One focus will be on the theatre histories of selected Latin American and African countries. Key questions will include: In what ways are artistic freedoms and practices linked to structures of governance?  How has theatre over time been a force for political change? Why does theatre flourish in some democracies (and in some authoritarian governments) and not in others? How are principles/ideals of democracy represented in dramatic literatures and theatrical endeavors at specific historical moments?
Prerequisite(s): POLSC 1000/POLSC 1000FYW United States Government and Politics or THTRE 1010 Theatre Appreciation or THTRE 1020 Script Analysis.
(Normally offered on odd fall semesters.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 3830 U.S. Theatre and Cultural Pluralism (3 hours)

U.S. Theatre and Cultural Pluralism is a Discourse-Instructive and Diversity-U.S.-Instructive course that considers drama and theatre by ethnic and racial minority writers, gender and sexual minority writers, and writers with disabilities, within the context of historical and contemporary cultural circumstances including economic class. The primary focus of this class is the examination of cultural pluralism as one of the ideals/principles of a democracy as embodied in dramatic works and theatre production practices. It seeks to investigate how theatre in the U.S. has served as a venue for voices that have been historically silenced and/or marginalized, while acknowledging that theatre has sometimes been used as an instrument of oppression. The dramatic works read will allow discussion of topics including: features of a democracy, structures of power, principles of cultural pluralism, what it means to be a citizen in a democracy, and obstacles to full participation in a democracy.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 1020 Script Analysis or POLSC 1000/POLSC 1000FYW United States Government and Politics or permission of instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 4480 Professional Preparation for Theatre (3 hours)

A course for students preparing for careers in theatre. Projects will include resume and portfolio preparation, auditioning, and interviewing techniques, introduction to internships, apprenticeships, and graduate study.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

THTRE 4700 Scenography III (3 hours)

An advanced design studio course focusing on scenery, costume and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the visual world of a number of multi-act dramas, comedies or musicals from contemporary and historical periods, creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings, a scale model and drafting. Additionally, students will work collaboratively with an advanced student director to design one or more elements of a realized production. The course emphasizes script analysis, visual research in the design process and designer/director communication. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 3710 Scenography II.

THTRE 4710 Scenography IV (3 hours)

A capstone design studio course focusing on scenery, costume and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the entire visual world of a multi-act drama, comedy or musical from contemporary or historical periods, approved by the instructor, creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings, a finished model and drafting. Additionally, students will work collaborately with a faculty director to design one or more elements of realized production. The course emphasizes script analysis, visual research in the design process and designer/director communication. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 4700 Scenography III and instructor permission.

THTRE 4970 Internship (1-8 hours)

On-the-job training for theatre arts majors and minors in theatre-related organizations. Students will arrange for their positions according to departmental guidelines, and each internship will be designed to the satisfaction of the sponsor, faculty coordinator, and student. Students may repeat the course and earn a maximum of 6 hours credit.
P/F only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
THTRE 4990 Senior Theatre Project (1-3 hours)

The senior theatre project is done under the immediate supervision of a theatre faculty or teaching-staff member in one of these areas: costumes, scenery, lights, properties, makeup, acting, stage management, or directing. The student and the director of the theatre must first determine the feasibility of the proposed project for a full-length play (i.e., at least 90 minutes playing time) and select a theatre faculty/teaching-staff member supervisor. This planning process must be completed no later than May 1 of the junior year. The student will be responsible for doing the research, designing the project and seeing it to completion. The supervisor will serve as a consultant throughout the project, will grade the project, and will arrange for the student to present a description of his or her accomplishment to interested persons. See the director of the theatre for further guidelines and procedures.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

ART 1050 Basic Design (3 hours)

This course gives students a working comprehension of the elements and principles of design in a variety of media.  Students are expected to develop a strong studio work ethic, increase creative problem-solving capabilities, and discover ways to communicate ideas visually.  Students learn through making, self-reflection, and critique to develop a verbal/visual vocabulary that forms the foundation for the future study of art.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
ART 1300 Drawing 1 (3 hours)

An introduction to drawing by surveying its use as a foundation for future study in all 2D and 3D media. Various levels (1-4) of this studio art medium may meet together. The course requirements of each level are different.

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
ENG 3000 Shakespeare (4 hours)

A systematic study of the outstanding literary artist of the English language: comedies, tragedies, and historical plays.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing, ENG 2000 Introduction to Textual Studies or THTRE 1020 Script Analysis and Junior standing.
(Normally offered spring of odd-numbered years.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
ENG 3260 Greek Drama (3 hours)

In this course, students will read a selection of plays by ancient Greek playrights: the comedies of Aristophanes and the tragedies of Aeschylus, Euripides, and Sophocles. For a semester project, students will work as a collaborative team to write and perform a dramatic work (along with related documents) to demonstrate their understanding of the genre, period, and culture.
Cross listed with THTRE 3260.
Prerequisite(s): First Year Writing and Junior Standing.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
HIST 3220 The Ancient World (4 hours)

See HIST 4220 The Ancient World.

THTRE 1020 Script Analysis (3 hours)

This is a fundamental course in the systematic analysis of dramatic texts. It is designed to equip theatre arts majors and minors with the textual expertise and vocabulary needed for academic discussion and artistic collaboration. Students will read and research a series of scripts in order to investigate the process in which a play develops from page to performance. Emphasis will also be given to how directors, designers, performers, and spectators individually and collaboratively engage with and utilize a dramatic text during each phase of the pre-rehearsal, rehearsal, and performance process.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

THTRE 1300 Acting I (3 hours)

This introductory acting course focuses on building physical, vocal, intellectual, and intuitive foundations for actors. Through discovery exercises, students increase their awareness of the fundamentals of contemporary acting and apply these concepts to monologue and scene work.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
THTRE 1400 Stagecraft (3 hours)

A course introducing students to all technical aspects of theatre production including scenery, properties, lighting, sound, makeup, and costuming. Particular emphasis is placed on practical knowledge of scenery, property construction techniques, and the materials used. Students must participate in a laboratory theatre experience.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
THTRE 1410 Costume Construction (3 hours)

The introductory course in costuming for the theatre. It presents the uses of fabrics, textures, colors, plastics, and other materials as well as developing the sewing techniques needed for the theatre.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Foundational Literacies: Creative and Performing Arts
THTRE 2000 Play Reading (1 hour)

Play reading is a course that focuses on the reading, discussion, and interpretation of dramatic texts. Its aim is to provide a concentrated study of both content and form of selected texts in an effort to broaden knowledge of dramatic techniques genre, and strategies for interpretation. Dramatic texts will vary each semester with the goal that students will gain knowledge of a large quantity of plays during a four-year period. This course may be repeated for credit up to eight times for Theatre Arts majors and up to three times for Theatre Arts minors.

THTRE 2010 Dramatic Literature: Pulitzer Prize (2 hours)

The Pulitzer Prizes are regarded as one of the most prestigious awards that a writer or composer can win. The Pulitzer Prize in Drama is awarded "for a distinguished play by an American author, preferably original in its source, and dealing with American life". Given the emphases on American authorship and American life, this speaking-instructive dramatic literature course examines Pulitzer Prize winning plays such as Angels in America, The Kentucky Cycle, Topdog/Underdog, Disgraced and others to investigate questions about the features of a democracy and what it means to be a citizen of a democracy. The plays also serve as the basis for a series of oral presentations. The course also asks: To what extent is the representation of democratic principles and ideas a contributing factor in what plays win the Pulitzer Prize in Drama.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2020 Dramatic Literature: Tony Awards (2 hours)

Dating from 1947, the American Theatre Wing's Tony Awards have been presented annually to honor excellence in commercial theatre on Broadway. It is a high honor for a writer or composer to win the award for Best Play or Best Musical, and usually results in financial and career gains. This speaking instructive dramatic literature course examines this U.S. awards tradition, considering how the procedural structures incorporate elements of democratic ideals and principles. Students will read examples of Tony Award winning plays and musicals in order to consider how democratic ideals are represented in those plays and will consider whether such representation is contributing factor in what works with the awards. The plays also serve as the basis for a series of oral presentations.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2030 Dramatic Literature: American Comedy (2 hours)

Is nurturing the subversive comic impulse in expression vital to a democracy? This speaking-instructive dramatic literature course examines the comic tradition in U.S. dramatic writing, focusing primarily on how democratic principles and ideals have been represented. One primary topic to be considered involves the ways that comic plays, whether overtly or subversively, can serve as a contributing factor to stimulate political change in a democracy. A range of plays from early national to contemporary will be read and discussed to draw conclusions about features of a democracy and what it means to be a citizen of a democracy. The plays will also serve as the basis for oral presentations.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2040 Dramatic Literature: Families (2 hours)

This speaking-instructive dramatic literature course examines how definitions and concepts of family have been represented in dramatic literary works. By reading, discussing, reflecting in writing and making oral presentations about a variety of dramatic works drawn from diverse perspectives students will consider how changes in cultural and institutional environments impact definitions of family and how concepts of family are interconnected with other with other social institutions.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
THTRE 2050 Dramatic Literature: Gender and Sexuality (2 hours)

This speaking-instructive dramatic literature class examines how varieties of feminisms and cultural diversity have been represented in dramatic literary works. By reading, discussion, reflecting in writing and making oral presentations about a variety of dramatic works drawn from diverse perspectives students will utilize recent scholarship in gender and sexuality studies to analyze how assumptions about gender and/or sexualities have contributed to inequalities, choices, biases, oppression and/or empowerment in the culture and time periods in which the plays were written and produced.
Cross listed with GEND 2050.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Gender and Sexuality Thread
THTRE 2060 Dramatic Literature: Banned and Censored (2 hours)

Why does censorship occur in democracies that champion freedom of expression as an ideal? What are the tipping points that trigger the impulse to ban and/or censor? Does censorship or the threat of censorship present an obstacle to full participation of writers and readers in a democracy? Students seek the answers to these and other questions in this speaking-instructive dramatic literature course by looking at example of dramatic works that have been banned or censored in democratic nations. The selected texts will also serve as the basis for a series of oral presentations and will be utilized to discuss how the defining features of a democracy and the meaning of what it means to be a citizen in a democracy are represented in dramatic texts, as well as the broader question of how the arts shape how a nation defines itself as a democracy.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Speaking Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 2110 Masterpieces of Dramatic Literature (3 hours)

Masterpieces of Dramatic Literature is an introductory course designed to provide a historical perspective on the literary record of human interactions with nature, the supernatural, and other humans. Utilizing dramatic texts selected from a range of cultures, genres, and time periods (including core readings from Greek or Roman classical literature, the Bible, Shakespeare, non-Western literature, literature by women, and literature by writers of color), students will devise strategies for reading, discussing, and writing about dramatic literature. These strategies will include consideration of biographical materials, cultural contexts and analysis of the functions of drama and theatre, in particular historical and geographical circumstances. Students will also be asked to consider how texts come to be valued as masterpieces, and the politics involved in such valuation.

THTRE 2160 Stage Management (3 hours)

Stage Management is an introductory course in production management. Students will be introduced to the basic guidelines and techniques for stage managing theatre productions including: communication skills, collaboration skills, rehearsal management, assembling the stage manager's cue and production book, and tech rehearsal/production run management. Students will also learn about professional stage management and Equity rules, guidelines, and membership, It is anticipated that each class member will serve as a stage manager for a university production and submit a detailed cue and production book.
(Normally offered every spring semester.)

THTRE 2500 Directing I (3 hours)

A study of the theories and techniques of directing. Students will direct several short scenes.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 1020 Script Analysis.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Exploratory
THTRE 2700 Approaching Scenography (3 hours)

This is an introductory course in the theory and practice of scenography for the theatre. The primary goal of this class is to provide access to terms, concepts, and design principle applications for theatrical scenery, costume, and lighting design.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

THTRE 2710 Scenographic Techniques (3 hours)

An introduction to the basic tools and techniques of creating scenographic design documents and models for the theatre. Technical documents of ground plans, sections, elevations and lighting plots will be explored using CAD. Costume and set rendering will be explored using traditional and computer methods. Model making will be explored using both traditional and computer assisted methods.

THTRE 3000 Shakespeare (4 hours)

See ENG 3000 Shakespeare.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
THTRE 3190 History of Period Style (3 hours)

History of Period Style is a class for theatre performers, directors, designers and generalists, who wish to have a basis of knowledge about the major historical periods in Western Civilization that are the setting for the majority of plays in the western canon. This course will be an overview of the most important innovations in architecture, art, costume, furniture and decorative arts, and music for each period, as they influence theatrical production.
Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or permission of the instructor.

THTRE 3260 Greek Drama (3 hours)

See ENG 3260 Greek Drama.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Chaos Thread
THTRE 3500 Directing II (3 hours)

Students will direct under supervision a one-act play or (with instructor's permission) a full-length play. This course may be repeated.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 2500 Directing I.
(Normally offered each fall and spring semester.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
THTRE 3700 Scenography I (3 hours)

An introductory design studio course focusing on scenery, costume, and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the visual world of a number of dramas, comedies, or musicals creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings, and drafting. The course also emphasizes script analysis and visual research in the design process. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 1020 Script Analysis, THTRE 2700 Approaching Scenography, and THTRE 2710 Scenographic Techniques or permission of the instructor.

THTRE 3710 Scenography II (3 hours)

An intermediate design studio course focusing on scenery, costume and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the visual world of a number of moderate size dramas, comedies or musicals from contemporary and historical periods, creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings and drafting. The course also emphasizes script analysis and visual research in the design process. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 3700 Scenography I.

THTRE 3800 World Theatre History I (3 hours)

An integral factor in the study of the history of theatre is the impact that governments, democratic or otherwise, have on the development and sustenance of the arts. World Theatre History I is a Writing-Instructive course that covers early theatre through the Renaissance, so will investigate principles and ideals of Athenian democracy associated with Classical Greece, republican Rome, and the Italian republics of the early Renaissance, as well as more authoritarian forms of rule in early civilizations in India, China, Japan, and Meso-America.  Key questions will include: In what ways are artistic freedoms and practices linked to structures of governance?  How has theatre over time been a force for political change? Why does theatre flourish in some democracies (and in some authoritarian governments) and not in others? 
Prerequisite(s): POLSC 1000/POLSC 1000FYW United States Government and Politics or THTRE 1010 Theatre Appreciation or THTRE 1020 Script Analysis.
(Normally offered on even fall semesters.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 3810 World Theatre History II (3 hours)

An integral factor in the study of the history of theatre is the impact that governments, democratic or otherwise, have on the development and sustenance of the arts. World Theatre History II is a Writing-Instructive and Diversity-Global Instructive course that covers the span from late 17th C through present day, so will investigate the Age of Reason and the movement toward representative democracy as well as contemporary developments. One focus will be on the theatre histories of selected Latin American and African countries. Key questions will include: In what ways are artistic freedoms and practices linked to structures of governance?  How has theatre over time been a force for political change? Why does theatre flourish in some democracies (and in some authoritarian governments) and not in others? How are principles/ideals of democracy represented in dramatic literatures and theatrical endeavors at specific historical moments?
Prerequisite(s): POLSC 1000/POLSC 1000FYW United States Government and Politics or THTRE 1010 Theatre Appreciation or THTRE 1020 Script Analysis.
(Normally offered on odd fall semesters.)

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Writing Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: Global
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 3830 U.S. Theatre and Cultural Pluralism (3 hours)

U.S. Theatre and Cultural Pluralism is a Discourse-Instructive and Diversity-U.S.-Instructive course that considers drama and theatre by ethnic and racial minority writers, gender and sexual minority writers, and writers with disabilities, within the context of historical and contemporary cultural circumstances including economic class. The primary focus of this class is the examination of cultural pluralism as one of the ideals/principles of a democracy as embodied in dramatic works and theatre production practices. It seeks to investigate how theatre in the U.S. has served as a venue for voices that have been historically silenced and/or marginalized, while acknowledging that theatre has sometimes been used as an instrument of oppression. The dramatic works read will allow discussion of topics including: features of a democracy, structures of power, principles of cultural pluralism, what it means to be a citizen in a democracy, and obstacles to full participation in a democracy.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 1020 Script Analysis or POLSC 1000/POLSC 1000FYW United States Government and Politics or permission of instructor.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Discourse Instructive
Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Diversity Instructive: U.S.
Archway Curriculum: Integrative Core: Democracy Thread
THTRE 4480 Professional Preparation for Theatre (3 hours)

A course for students preparing for careers in theatre. Projects will include resume and portfolio preparation, auditioning, and interviewing techniques, introduction to internships, apprenticeships, and graduate study.
(Normally offered each fall semester.)

THTRE 4700 Scenography III (3 hours)

An advanced design studio course focusing on scenery, costume and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the visual world of a number of multi-act dramas, comedies or musicals from contemporary and historical periods, creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings, a scale model and drafting. Additionally, students will work collaboratively with an advanced student director to design one or more elements of a realized production. The course emphasizes script analysis, visual research in the design process and designer/director communication. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 3710 Scenography II.

THTRE 4710 Scenography IV (3 hours)

A capstone design studio course focusing on scenery, costume and lighting design for the theatre. Students will design the entire visual world of a multi-act drama, comedy or musical from contemporary or historical periods, approved by the instructor, creating standard designer communication documents including sketches, renderings, a finished model and drafting. Additionally, students will work collaborately with a faculty director to design one or more elements of realized production. The course emphasizes script analysis, visual research in the design process and designer/director communication. Students will assemble a portfolio documenting their designs.
Prerequisite(s): THTRE 4700 Scenography III and instructor permission.

THTRE 4970 Internship (1-8 hours)

On-the-job training for theatre arts majors and minors in theatre-related organizations. Students will arrange for their positions according to departmental guidelines, and each internship will be designed to the satisfaction of the sponsor, faculty coordinator, and student. Students may repeat the course and earn a maximum of 6 hours credit.
P/F only.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.

Archway Curriculum: Essential Connections: Experiential Learning: Intensive
THTRE 4990 Senior Theatre Project (1-3 hours)

The senior theatre project is done under the immediate supervision of a theatre faculty or teaching-staff member in one of these areas: costumes, scenery, lights, properties, makeup, acting, stage management, or directing. The student and the director of the theatre must first determine the feasibility of the proposed project for a full-length play (i.e., at least 90 minutes playing time) and select a theatre faculty/teaching-staff member supervisor. This planning process must be completed no later than May 1 of the junior year. The student will be responsible for doing the research, designing the project and seeing it to completion. The supervisor will serve as a consultant throughout the project, will grade the project, and will arrange for the student to present a description of his or her accomplishment to interested persons. See the director of the theatre for further guidelines and procedures.
Prerequisite(s): Permission of the department chair.