Nebraska Wesleyan University News https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/ en NWU Program Will Fully Fund Tuition for Learn to Dream Scholars https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/nwu-program-will-fully-fund-tuition-learn-dream-scholars <span property="schema:name">NWU Program Will Fully Fund Tuition for Learn to Dream Scholars</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan University is launching a new scholarship program that will help more area community college students aspire to complete a bachelor’s degree. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The Aspire NWU Scholarship Program will fully fund tuition through federal, state and NWU merit-based and need-based aid for Southeast Community College’s Learn to Dream Scholars who quality for the federal Pell Grant. The program will serve most students whose family adjusted gross incomes are at or below $60,000. Approximately 30 percent of NWU students receive the Pell Grant.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Nebraska Wesleyan has an outstanding partnership with Southeast Community College to help open more doors to bachelor’s degree completion,” said Nebraska Wesleyan University President Darrin Good. “This further strengthens that partnership and helps these high-achieving students who want to pursue a bachelor’s degree to do so in an affordable way.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Thanks to the generosity of the Acklie Charitable Foundation, Nelnet and Union Bank &amp; Trust, the Learn to Dream Scholars Program provides economically-disadvantaged students from Lincoln public and private schools the opportunity to complete 60 semester credit hours at one of SCC’s campuses without paying tuition and fees. The program also provides 30 semester credit hours to students who reside in SCC’s 15-county service area.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>SCC students who complete 12 credit hours from any of its six learning centers are eligible to transfer to NWU. Qualifications for the Aspire NWU Scholarship Program include:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span>Current student or graduate of the Learn to Dream Scholars Program</span></span></li> <li><span><span>Nebraska resident</span></span></li> <li><span><span>Federal Pell Grant eligible</span></span></li> <li><span><span>Apply and enroll in a traditional NWU undergraduate degree program</span></span></li> <li><span><span>Carry a full-time academic course load of 12-18 credit hours per semester </span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The program, which begins in fall 2021, is renewable annually until the recipient has completed their bachelor’s degree. Students must also maintain full-time status and maintain at least a 2.0 GPA. Outside scholarships, unsubsidized federal student loans and on-campus work study may be used for room and board and other educational expenses at NWU.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“We’re committed to providing the resources necessary to remove financial burden and worry from economically-disadvantaged students,” said Good.” “Students can solely focus on their academics and college experiences that will help them to thrive here and position them for success beyond graduation,” said Good. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Our mission at Nebraska Wesleyan is well-aligned with that of the Learn to Dream Scholars Program to ultimately improve the lives of students we serve,” Good added. “Our commitment to personal attention and small class sizes create a particularly strong foundation for these scholars to succeed and graduate.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The Learn to Dream Scholarship at Southeast Community College is an incredible opportunity for economically disadvantaged students to access the life-changing benefits of higher education by offering up to two years of college credit tuition free,” said Paul Illich, president of Southeast Community College. “Through a new partnership between Nebraska Wesleyan University and Southeast Community College, Learn to Dream Scholars will have the opportunity to pursue a bachelor’s degree tuition fee. SCC is honored to be a committed partner in this new scholarship program as we seek to empower and transform the diverse learners and communities of southeast Nebraska.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>For transfer students not eligible for the new Aspire NWU Scholarship Program, NWU offers other scholarships including a $20,000 <a href="https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/admissions/transfer">Pathways Transfer Scholarship</a> for students transferring from Southeast Community College, Central Community College, Iowa Western Community College, Metropolitan Community College and Mid-Plains Community College. More than 160 students have received the Pathways Scholarship since its start in 2017. Nebraska Wesleyan also offers the <a href="https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/admissions/transfer/transfer-scholarships/scholarships-ptk-members">Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Scholarship</a> to qualified community college students who are members of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, an academic honorary. The PTK Scholarship provides $21,000 in financial aid.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Transfer students have an outstanding performance record at Nebraska Wesleyan,” said Good. “We want students to view us as a transfer school destination — a welcoming, rewarding place where they can continue on their educational journey.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2021-01-13T15:54:49+00:00">Wed, 01/13/2021 - 9:54am</span> Wed, 13 Jan 2021 15:54:49 +0000 Sara Olson 620571 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu President Good Reflects on January 6 Attack on Democracy https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/president-good-reflects-january-6-attack-democracy <span property="schema:name">President Good Reflects on January 6 Attack on Democracy</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Like many of you, I watched Wednesday’s attack on our democracy with great disbelief and a heavy, heavy heart. These feelings plague me today, and will likely continue in the days ahead.  As President of Nebraska Wesleyan University, I feel it is my obligation to speak clearly and directly to you about Wednesday’s events.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p>Nebraska Wesleyan was founded in 1887 and throughout our history we have been blessed by and grounded in the distinct and unfaltering democracy of the United States.  It’s a democracy governed for the people, by the people and protects the freedoms we all enjoy so dearly. </p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We join others around the nation – from both parties – and around the world in condemning the violent attack on Congress, our democratic election, the peaceful transition of power and our Constitution.  This was NOT a democratic protest but rather a riot or an insurrection.  Others have even characterized it as a traitorous event and an attempted coup d’état.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Our students’ education is rooted in critical thinking, analysis of evidence and information literacy to discern legitimate information and facts. </span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span>It is our responsibility to nurture growth of the whole person — to expand students’ intellectual skills AND broaden their perspective on humanity. That’s what our campus constituents expect of us.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We take great pride in our ability to transform lives at Nebraska Wesleyan and prepare students for the multi-faceted experiences that are ahead of them. Clearly<span>,</span> our mission is more critical now than ever, as we do our part to develop citizens of this nation who can act with conviction that is based on truth, justice and verifiable evidence in our participation in democracy and defense of the <span>C</span>onstitution.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>As our 32nd President, Franklin D. Roosevelt said, “Democracy cannot succeed unless those who express their choice are prepared to choose</span></span> w<span><span>isely. The real safeguard of democracy, therefore, is education.”  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I hope you will join me in condemning the individuals involved in Wednesday’s attack on the Capitol, and I ask you to join me in prayer for the healing and return to a civil and functional democracy where trust and decency reign.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>With Love and Hope,</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br /> <em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>President Darrin Good</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></em></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2021-01-07T21:41:04+00:00">Thu, 01/07/2021 - 3:41pm</span> Thu, 07 Jan 2021 21:41:04 +0000 Sara Olson 620564 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Campus Mourns Long-time Chemistry Professor https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/campus-mourns-long-time-chemistry-professor <span property="schema:name">Campus Mourns Long-time Chemistry Professor</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan is mourning the loss of long-time chemistry professor Dr. Mark Werth who died unexpectedly on Saturday, December 5, 2020.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>For 27 years, Dr. Werth touched the lives and shaped the minds of chemistry students at Nebraska Wesleyan University. Throughout his career, he taught chemical principles, organic chemistry, biochemistry, advanced biochemistry and the laboratories that accompanied those classes. He mentored first-year undergraduate students enrolled in the Introduction to Research course and he supervised undergraduates enrolled in upper-level chemistry research courses. Dr. Werth also taught a Liberal Arts Seminar for first-year students titled, “Drugs and Society.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In 2018, Nebraska Wesleyan honored Dr. Werth as its newest member of the Quarter Century Club for his service to the university and the role his played in providing the distinctive, experience-rich education that means so much to NWU students. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>During that recognition, his colleagues in the Department of Chemistry reflected on his impact describing Dr. Werth as accommodating, patient, supportive, innovative, the quiet giant of the department and “pure Prairie Wolf gold.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dr. Werth was hailed for his work in creating the biochemistry and molecular biology major, which required extensive cooperation and coordination with academic departments outside his own. The major has attracted a mix of strong academic scholars from across the country. To date, 158 students have graduated with a degree in biochemistry and molecular biology and have gone onto medical and graduate school and careers in health and industry.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Mark is the quiet giant of our department,” colleague and fellow chemistry professor Jodi Ryter said during his Quarter Century Club recognition. “He is an exceptional and generous mentor, an active curriculum scholar, a ground-breaking program developer, and above all, a consummate professional in the classroom. He has served Nebraska Wesleyan University at the highest level, which is the only way he knows how.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In addition to teaching, Dr. Werth served as chair of the Department of Chemistry from 2002-2006 and interim chair of the Department of Mathematics from January 2018 to July 2018. He also served on the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and the Institutional Review Board.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Throughout his tenure, his research was published in the <em>Journal of the American Chemical Society</em> and the <em>Journal of Inorganic Biochemistry</em> among others and he presented his research locally, regionally and nationally. He was a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Chemical Society and Nebraska Academy of Science.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The NWU community held a virtual remembrance for Dr. Werth on Friday, December 11. <a href="https://youtu.be/AVM9jfC64WY">Watch now</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-12-09T18:02:51+00:00">Wed, 12/09/2020 - 12:02pm</span> Wed, 09 Dec 2020 18:02:51 +0000 Sara Olson 620544 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Social Work Professor Wins Exemplary Teacher Award https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/social-work-professor-wins-exemplary-teacher-award <span property="schema:name">Social Work Professor Wins Exemplary Teacher Award</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Professor Kara Cavel’s commitment to anti-racist </span><span>practices is helping to push us all to create a more inclusive classroom environment where the voices of all have a place in instruction,” say her colleagues in the Department of Social Work.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>She brings diverse content to students to learn beyond a typical classroom lecture. She revises her courses to include current events and experiences. She asks students to attend art exhibits that demonstrate key social issues. She asks them to listen to community activists on their work to improve social justice.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Cavel’s work and dedication to providing inclusive experiences and opportunities to all students has earned her this year’s Exemplary Teaching Award.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The award is given to an NWU professor each year who exemplifies excellence in teaching, civility and concern for students and colleagues, commitment to value-centered education, and service to students, the institution, community or church. The award is sponsored by the Division of Higher Education of the United Methodist Church and the Office of the President at Nebraska Wesleyan.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>For the past 10 years, the associate professor of social work has taught nearly every core course offered in the undergraduate social work program, resulting in greater connectivity with social work students and faculty. But Cavel was especially praised for her attentiveness to the needs of NWU’s adult students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“She also recognizes that our adult students bring with them lives and histories that sometimes need to be considered when exploring deadlines and requirements,” said colleague Toni Jensen, assistant professor of social work. “She will work with students to find ways for them to meet her expectations, while also helping them navigate the realities of their own lives.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In addition to teaching classes on both the Lincoln campus and at NWU’s Omaha site, Cavel has served in many capacities including advisor for the student organization, Global Service Learning, which she accompanied on both national and international service trips. She serves on the undergraduate curriculum committee, Forum Committee and has helped develop courses for the university’s new Master of Social Work degree. She gives back to her community as a practicing clinical social worker in Omaha, teaches yoga, has trained Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) volunteers and has served as a board member on the National Association of Social Workers, Nebraska Chapter Board of Directors. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>She is described as a regular source of stability and comfort for students,” said Jensen. “</span></span><span>We are fortunate to have Dr. Cavel in our community and I believe she is very deserving of this Exemplary Teacher award.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-12-01T21:43:59+00:00">Tue, 12/01/2020 - 3:43pm</span> Tue, 01 Dec 2020 21:43:59 +0000 Sara Olson 620535 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Student, Professor’s Collaborative Research on Mindfulness Helps New Students Adapt https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/student-professors-collaborative-research-mindfulness-helps-new-students <span property="schema:name">Student, Professor’s Collaborative Research on Mindfulness Helps New Students Adapt </span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>It’s not unusual to find communication professor Karla Jensen leading a yoga class on a campus lawn. This semester, the activity has provided a much-needed and safe refuge to students dealing with the uncertainties of a pandemic.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Beyond relaxing on the lawn, Jensen has continued to infuse the importance of yoga and mindfulness into her courses including her Archways Seminar, “Be. Here. Now: Mindfulness Theory and Practice.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Last February when Jensen was thinking about the course, she was approached by Morgan Dondlinger, a junior communication studies major from Lincoln, who planned to be Jensen’s student instructor. Together, they applied for a Student Faculty Collaborative Research Grant, which supports collaborative research and creative projects between students and their professors.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The grant would send them both to Oregon for a five-day mindfulness pedagogy training to better prepare them for their Archway Seminar. Unfortunately, COVID-19 stopped their travel. Instead, they spent six weeks attending a virtual training with well-known mindfulness scholar and author Oren Jay Sofer. The training included 1,000 other mindfulness practitioners from across the world.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Although I was disappointed that we could not experience the retreat in Oregon,” said Dondlinger, “when Karla approached me with this new, virtual idea, I couldn't have been more excited.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dondlinger said combining their interest in mindfulness and nonviolent communication into a virtual course, would allow them to adapt their upcoming Archway Seminar for first-year students. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The reason mindfulness is vital to nonviolent communication is because when we can cultivate awareness of ourselves and thoughts, emotions manifest themselves in our bodies, and we are better able to respond instead of react,” said Dondlinger. “This awareness allows us to better connect with our conversational partner.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The online course emphasized foundations of presence, intention, attention, listening, and reflecting. This style of conversation creates a safe, dialogic environment where participants may get to the root of a belief rather than relying solely on the initial words on their position. Finding a balance between communication and mindfulness is more vital now than ever, Dondlinger said, especially in times of crisis and national discourse. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span> “Our [communication studies] department is rooted in the social interactionism theory that we create relationships in community, and that we should speak so others may listen, and listen so others may speak,” said Dondlinger. “It’s not just choosing our words with care but listening open-heartedly and with awareness to better know the other person rather than gathering ammunition to change someone’s mind.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Customizing the course to address the unique challenges for this year’s first-year students, Jensen and Dondlinger focused on helping students navigate issues surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic, national political unease and transitioning to college students. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“We want students to recognize — especially now — their own needs for connection, self-care, and to communicate with professors or roommates, and this training is going to help them,” Dondlinger said. “A core component of this Archway Seminar revolves around giving students the tools they need to combat stress through contemplative practice.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Jensen said her students have shared that they feel better equipped to persist and practice patience when they encounter their new obstacles.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Over the past several years, I have seen the compelling benefits of mindfulness in the lives of my students,” said Jensen. “Mindfulness cultivates discernment, patience, and calm in all storms – even the sometimes choppy waters of college, even in a pandemic.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I am honored to share the scholarship and practice of this lifelong skill with Morgan and our first-year students,” she added.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Each year, Jensen wants each student instructor to be deeply involved in the planning and delivery of the course. She takes enormous care in choosing and mentoring every student instructor and together choosing the content for the course. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“From my perspective, our summer training resulted in an even more fulfilling teaching-learning relationship for us, and it enhanced the classroom experience for our Archway Seminar students.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dondlinger, who plans to graduate in May 2022, said the experience has her considering a career as a professor. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I couldn't be more grateful to Karla for the experience she has given me throughout the summer and this semester, and I look forward to her guidance as I begin this new exploratory journey,” she said. “A relationship like the one I have with Karla is what excites me about the potential of becoming a professor myself.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em>—Story by Danielle Anderson, student writer</em></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-11-22T18:15:04+00:00">Sun, 11/22/2020 - 12:15pm</span> Sun, 22 Nov 2020 18:15:04 +0000 Sara Olson 620525 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Students Team with NYC Composers for New NWU Theatre Production, "Fresh Voices" https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/students-team-nyc-composers-new-nwu-theatre-production-fresh-voices <span property="schema:name">Students Team with NYC Composers for New NWU Theatre Production, &quot;Fresh Voices&quot;</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The bright lights of New York City — darkened by the pandemic — will be felt on Nebraska Wesleyan University’s O’Donnell Auditorium stage when the Theatre Department opens its first musical cabaret, “Fresh Voices.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>With much attention aimed at safe and socially distant live performances, the Theatre Department turned to its New York City connections to help inspire “Fresh Voices,” which will feature unproduced works by composers from the Big Apple.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Anne McAlexander, visiting assistant professor of musical theatre, utilized her connections to pair composers with NWU theatre students. Students participated in six zoom workshops that were led by artists including American playwright Laura Gunderson, America’s most produced living playwright; singer composer Ari Afsar who is best known for her starring role in “Hamilton,” jazz and rock musician Todd Sickafoose, a Tony and Grammy Award winner, among others. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“One of the most exciting things about this project is how our students are getting to interact with the composers and writers,” said McAlexander, a graduate of SUNY Fredoria who has directed and choreographed for several schools and festivals in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. “Unless actors are workshopping a new musical, this is a rare and awesome opportunity.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Fresh Voices” showcases NWU students as emerging artists as they will be singing new and unproduced works. The title also gives a nod to the different perspectives on current challenges in society that will be featured in the music. Inspired by politics, societal unrest, and the pandemic among other themes, the cabaret will feature works inspired by the late Ruth Bader Ginsberg, mental health, the need for compassion and unity, and voting and representation. </span></span><span>The production will also include speaking roles written by Gunderson that were inspired by the NWU students’ personal stories.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Not only does this show amplify traditionally underrepresented voices in society, but the collaboration helps students recognize the vast possibilities of using their art for change,” said McAlexander.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Several of the composers wrote pieces specifically for our students and their interests,” she said. “I think it is incredibly important for young actors to know that their voice matters and that when they have the chance, they should seize the opportunity.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Raimy Washington, a senior acting major from Omaha, agrees.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“It is an artist’s responsibility to represent the times and these are quite the times to represent,” said Washington. “There is a lot going on in our world and who better to tell this story than artists who will put it in a format that makes it timeless.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>While COVID-19 has led the Theatre Department to adapt to new ways of performing, students recognize that the opportunity to collaborate with New York City composers likely would not have happened in this way without the pandemic. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“COVID-19 has helped us be able to work with so many different new artists that are so diverse in life experiences and identities,” said John Alden, a junior musical theatre major from Olathe, Kan.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Not only is this experience desperately needed right now during a global pandemic when so many theatre artists are out of work,” McAlexander added, “but this experience is valuable in teaching our students how they can use their art to amplify their voices and bring attention to topics that are important to them.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The Theatre Department continues to follow all directed health measures: audience members will be socially distanced and seated 15 feet away from the stage. All performances will be held in O’Donnell Auditorium — the university’s largest performance venue; masks are required for all audience members, and there will be no intermission.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Even though they’re not performing for sold-out crowds or utilizing large casts, students said the current circumstances are a lesson in adaptation.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“It is a crazy time for the arts,” said Washington who will graduate in December. “But I’m certain I will be doing something wherever I go even if that means I have to create my own opportunities.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Fresh Voices: Spotlighting the Future” will be performed October 23-24 and October 30-31 at 7:30 p.m. with matinee shows on October 25 and November 1 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $7.50 and must be reserved in advance </span></span><span><a href="https://tix5.centerstageticketing.com/sites/nebraskawesleyan6/"><span>online</span></a></span><span><span> or call the box office at 402.465.2384. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The collaborations and interactions with the New York City composers have been made possible through a generous grant from the Pace Woods Foundation. Since 2012, the Foundation has helped fund 11 musical theatre productions, 14 guest artist engagements and the New York City excursion typically taken during spring break. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>—Story by Danielle Anderson, student writer</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></em></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-10-20T16:40:50+00:00">Tue, 10/20/2020 - 11:40am</span> Tue, 20 Oct 2020 16:40:50 +0000 Sara Olson 620496 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu NWU Professors Launch “Nights of Horror” 31-Day Virtual Event https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/nwu-professors-launch-nights-horror-31-day-virtual-event <span property="schema:name">NWU Professors Launch “Nights of Horror” 31-Day Virtual Event</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Two Nebraska Wesleyan University art professors and self-proclaimed “horror nerds” are making certain that the spirit of Halloween continues despite a pandemic. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In fact, they’re making sure it’s celebrated all month long with their 31-day virtual event, Nights of Horror. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Together, Matthew Jarvis, visiting assistant professor of art history, and Juan Jose Castano-Marquez, assistant professor of digital media, contacted scholars, industry professionals, authors and directors who are leading figures in the field of horror to be featured nightly for this pop-cultural event.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“With COVID-19, programming on any scale is a challenge, but I was interested in what could be achieved online,” said Jarvis. “There was no question that if we were going to do this, it would be on a large scale. There is really something for everyone.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>For 31 days, a combination of screenings, interviews, readings, and demonstrations will be shared by some of the best in the horror industry. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Among those featured will be:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><strong>Gary Pullin,</strong> artist responsible for the shocking, chord-striking film posters of <em>Friday the 13th</em>, <em>A Nightmare on Elm Street</em>, <em>Halloween</em>, <em>The Big Lebowski</em>, <em>Vertigo</em>, and <em>The Babadook</em>, as well as countless soundtrack covers. </span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong>S. T. Joshi,</strong> American writer, musician, critic, and award-winning scholar whose work has largely focused on weird and fantastic fiction, especially the life and work of H. P. Lovecraft and associated writers. </span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong>Makeup artists</strong> including Joe Dulude, Emmy-nominated makeup artist who famously worked on productions including <em>Wicked</em>, <em>Beetlejuice</em>, <em>Spongebob Squarepants</em> <em>the Musical</em>, <em>Sunday in the Park with George</em>, <em>Anastasia</em>, <em>Sweet Charity</em>, <em>The Wedding Singer</em>, <em>Grease</em>, <em>Follies</em> and <em>Jekyll &amp; Hyde</em>. Dulude will transform himself into Beetlejuice during his talk.</span></span></li> <li><span><span><strong>Matt Ruff, </strong><em>New York Times</em> best-selling author and author of the novel, <em>Lovecraft Country</em>, which was recently adapted to an HBO series and released in August 2020. </span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“We are hoping that people are entertained, find new things to be interested by, and gain new appreciations even if they are themselves experts in an area,” said Jarvis. “The event is at its heart meant to be educational. That isn’t to say that education cannot be mixed with pop-culture and fun.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Both Jarvis and Castano-Marquez hope the event becomes an annual occurrence. Both are incorporating aspects into their classes too. Castano-Marquez is currently teaching an Archway Seminar for first-year students that explores camp, a style or mode of personal or creative expression that is absurdly exaggerated and often fuses elements of high and popular culture. Next semester, Jarvis will teach a course on global horror film.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>A complete schedule of events for Nights of Horror can be found at <a href="https://www.nwunightsofhorror.com/">https://www.nwunightsofhorror.com</a>. Events will be streamed on the same website beginning Thursday, October 1. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Follow Nights of Horror on Instagram at <a href="https://www.instagram.com/nwuhorror/">@nwuhorror</a> or on Twitter at <a href="https://twitter.com/NWUHorror">@NWUHorror</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em>—Story by Danielle Anderson, public relations intern.</em></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-28T15:04:42+00:00">Mon, 09/28/2020 - 10:04am</span> Mon, 28 Sep 2020 15:04:42 +0000 Sara Olson 619122 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu NWU Launches Scholarship Program to Fully Fund Tuition for Pell-Eligible Students https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/nwu-launches-scholarship-program-fully-fund-tuition-pell-eligible-students <span property="schema:name">NWU Launches Scholarship Program to Fully Fund Tuition for Pell-Eligible Students</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan University wants to make its private, personalized education accessible to all Nebraska students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“College affordability is absolutely critical now more than ever,” said President Darrin Good. “Nebraska Wesleyan has long been recognized for incredible experiences, prestigious honors and rewarding outcomes, and it’s important that we make those successes more accessible. The Access NWU Scholarship Program will do just that.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The Access NWU Scholarship Program will fully fund tuition through federal, state and NWU merit-based and need-based aid for Nebraska first-time, first-year students who qualify for the federal Pell Grant. The program will serve most students whose family adjusted gross incomes are at or below $60,000. Currently, approximately 30 percent of NWU students receive the Pell Grant.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The program, which begins in fall 2021, is renewable for full-time students who enroll for four years and enables them to earn up to 144 credit hours, allowing the opportunity to add additional majors and minors during their time at NWU. Students will need to maintain at least a 2.0 GPA. Outside scholarships, unsubsidized federal student loans and on-campus work study may be used for room and board and other educational expenses. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Good said removing financial burden plays a significant role in helping under-resourced, low-income and first-generation students to fully succeed in college and beyond.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I was a Pell grant recipient as a student and my wife was a first-generation college student, so launching the Access NWU Scholarship Program is very personal to me,” said Good.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Eliminating financial stresses allows these students to focus entirely on their academic and extracurricular experiences and further thrive in this environment,” Good added. “Personal attention, small classes and career-building experiences make NWU an ideal choice for these students.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In addition, Nebraska Wesleyan is increasing its scholarships for transfer students including a $20,000 Pathways Transfer Scholarship. In 2017, NWU initiated partnerships with five community colleges — Southeast Community College, Central Community College, Iowa Western Community College, Metropolitan Community College and Mid-Plains Community College — by offering the Pathways Transfer Scholarship. The partnership provides financial aid to help students complete their bachelor’s degree at NWU. Previously, the Pathways Transfer Scholarship provided $15,000 to transfer students who completed at least 18 credit hours. More than 160 students have received the Pathways Scholarship since its start. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan also offers the Phi Theta Kappa (PTK) Scholarship to qualified community college students who are members of the Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, an academic honorary. The PTK Scholarship will increase from $17,000 to $21,000.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Transfer students are an important part of our student body,” said Good. “They bring experience, diversity and continued academic success. It’s critical that we provide them with the same accessibility and affordability that we provide to our traditional undergraduates who begin their academic career here as first-year students.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Ultimately, financial aid is available to all traditional undergraduate students regardless of income.</span></span></span><span><span><span><span> For example, every student admitted to Nebraska Wesleyan receives a renewable scholarship</span></span></span></span><span> of $15,000 or more based on their academic credentials. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Regardless of income,” Good added, “we want students and their families to realize that Nebraska Wesleyan is affordable and offers a highly respected educational value due to the extraordinary career successes of our alumni.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-23T21:15:34+00:00">Wed, 09/23/2020 - 4:15pm</span> Wed, 23 Sep 2020 21:15:34 +0000 Sara Olson 619117 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu U.S. News Names NWU a Top Regional University https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/us-news-names-nwu-top-regional-university-2 <span property="schema:name">U.S. News Names NWU a Top Regional University</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><span><span><span>U.S. News &amp; World Report </span></span></span></em><span><span><span><span>has named Nebraska Wesleyan University a top regional university. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>NWU is ranked 15th among all colleges and universities named to the Best Regional Universities — Midwest category in the annual college rankings, which were released on September 14. NWU is the highest ranked Nebraska college or university in the category. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>U.S. News &amp; World Report</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></em><span><span><span><span><span> ranks universities on a variety of indicators including student outcomes such as rates of graduation and retention, assessment by academic peers, faculty resources, overall financial resources, ACT/SAT scores, high school class standing, and alumni giving.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><span><span><span>U.S. News &amp; World Report </span></span></span></em><span><span>compares nearly 1,400 colleges and universities in the country. NWU was ranked among 165 schools in the regional category, which includes schools that provide a full range of undergraduate majors and master’s degree programs. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>U.S. News &amp; World Report </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></em><span><span><span><span><span>also named Nebraska Wesleyan to its list of Best Value Schools, which factors academic quality and cost after accounting for total expenses and financial aid. NWU was also named to the list of A-Plus Schools for B Students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Earlier this fall, the <em>Princeton Review</em> named Nebraska Wesleyan University to its list of best colleges in the Midwest region. This list </span></span></span><span><span><span><span>included colleges in 12 states including Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>On August 24, Niche released its 2021 Best Colleges rankings, ranking NWU third among all colleges in Nebraska and second in private colleges.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.niche.com/colleges/nebraska-wesleyan-university/"><span><span><span><span><span>Niche rankings</span></span></span></span></span></a> are based on analysis of academic, admissions, financial and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education along with reviews from students and alumni. Niche also recognized NWU as the No. 1 best small college in Nebraska, No. 2 best colleges for business in Nebraska, No. 2 best colleges in nursing in Nebraska, No. 3 best value college in Nebraska and No. 3 college with the best student life in Nebraska.</span></span></span></span></span></span>  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>On August 31, <em>Money Magazine</em> named NWU to its best colleges list.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-13T20:41:49+00:00">Sun, 09/13/2020 - 3:41pm</span> Sun, 13 Sep 2020 20:41:49 +0000 Sara Olson 618772 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Symposium to Address How and Why We Choose to Vote https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/symposium-address-how-and-why-we-choose-vote <span property="schema:name">Symposium to Address How and Why We Choose to Vote</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In recognition of the 100th anniversary of women's right to vote and in anticipation of the upcoming election, Nebraska Wesleyan's annual Visions &amp; Ventures Symposium will address, "Vote!: How and Why We Choose."</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The symposium will be held on Wednesday, September 23 and will feature three keynote speakers who will address election imperatives, voter suppression and caucuses. Due to the pandemic, the NWU campus community will participate via Zoom. All lectures will also be streamed via Facebook Live on the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/NebraskaWesleyan">Nebraska Wesleyan University Facebook page</a>.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The schedule includes:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span><span><span>9 a.m. — </span></span></span></strong><span><strong>Nancy Thomas,</strong> director of the Institute for Democracy &amp; Higher Education at Tufts University. Thomas will discuss what to say to students who don't want to vote, and will address what it means to educate for democracy. </span><span><span><span>Thomas conducts research and provides assistance to colleges and universities to advance student political learning, discourse, equity and participation in democracy. Her work and scholarship center on higher education's democratic mission, college student political learning and engagement, free speech and academic freedom, and deliberative democracy on campuses and in communities. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong><span>11 a.m. —</span> </strong><span><strong>Gilda Daniels,</strong> associate professor of law at the University of Baltimore and author of “Uncounted: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in America.” She will share her research on how voter suppression hinders people of color from voting in the U.S. </span><span><span><span>Daniels is a nationally-recognized voting rights and election law expert. She served under as Deputy Chief in the Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division, Voting Section under the Clinton and Bush administrations. She has investigated, negotiated and litigated cases involving the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the National Voter Registration Act and other voting statutes. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><strong>1 p.m. — Rachel Paine Caufield</strong>, professor of political science at Drake University and author of “The Iowa Caucus.” Her talk is titled, “How the Iowa Caucuses (and U.S. Elections) Can Embody American Values for the Next Generation.” <span><span>Caufield — commonly known as "RPC" — is most excited by the ways that individual citizens get involved in and experience the political system. For the past four presidential campaign cycles, she has organized efforts to get students involved in the caucuses, and led the effort to host national presidential debates and forums with ABC, CBS, CNN and Fusion TV. In 2016, she published "The Iowa Caucus" with Arcadia Press.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Throughout the afternoon, students will participate in breakout sessions with local community partners to discuss local and state voting issues. The breakout sessions are only available to NWU faculty, staff and students.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p> </p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-13T19:36:50+00:00">Sun, 09/13/2020 - 2:36pm</span> Sun, 13 Sep 2020 19:36:50 +0000 Sara Olson 618771 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu NWU to Launch Lincoln’s Only Master of Social Work Degree https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/nwu-launch-lincolns-only-master-social-work-degree <span property="schema:name">NWU to Launch Lincoln’s Only Master of Social Work Degree</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan University will expand its graduate program offerings next fall with the area’s only Master of Social Work degree.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The degree will have an emphasis on advanced trauma conscious social work practice.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The current COVID-19 pandemic and evidence of racial injustice in our communities has demonstrated the clear need for this curricular focus, and we are ready to meet that need head on,” said Toni Jensen, assistant professor of social work, who will serve as program director. “We feel the program’s focus on trauma-conscious practice will help raise awareness to the impact of traumatic experiences on individuals, families, groups, communities and organizations. This awareness will be translated into skill development so future social work practitioners can help address this impact through promoting well-being and resiliency.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Applications for the 66-credit hour program will open on November 1. Full-time students can complete the degree in two years. Classes will begin in fall 2021. Students with undergraduate degrees in social work can apply for advanced standing with classes beginning in fall 2022. Those with advanced standing who attend classes full-time can complete the program in just one year. Students will have the flexibility to attend part-time. Classes will be offered face-to-face during evening classes on the university’s Lincoln campus. Scholarships will be available.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In May, the Higher Learning Commission approved NWU’s request to add a social work program at the master’s level. The university is now seeking accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of the Council on Social Work Education. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>President Darrin Good said the new program is part of the university’s strategic plan to address growth of academic programs that will attract new students through both undergraduate and graduate pathways. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The new Master of Social Work degree fulfills an identified market need in Lincoln and the surrounding area,” said Good. “This program has an enormous potential to draw students at both the graduate and undergraduate levels, enhancing the strength of our university while holding true to our core values of excellence, diversity and community.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>According to recent labor market analytics from Gray Associates, while just over one-third of social workers hold a master’s degree, earning the Master of Social Work can give applicants an edge in 41 percent of social work jobs nationally, 60 percent of social work jobs in the state of Nebraska, and 87 percent of social work jobs in the Lincoln metropolitan area.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This marks NWU’s fifth graduate program. Others include Master of Business Administration, Master of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing/Master of Business Administration joint degree and Master of Education.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-09-10T02:27:24+00:00">Wed, 09/09/2020 - 9:27pm</span> Thu, 10 Sep 2020 02:27:24 +0000 Sara Olson 618750 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Princeton Review Names NWU One of the Best in the Midwest https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/princeton-review-names-nwu-one-best-midwest <span property="schema:name">Princeton Review Names NWU One of the Best in the Midwest</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan University is one of the best colleges in the Midwest, according to the <em>Princeton Review, </em>which released its annual best colleges list on August 18.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>NWU was named among 158 colleges in the <em>Princeton Review’s</em> “Midwest region” category. The schools are not listed in a ranked numerical order. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The <em>Princeton Review’s</em> college rankings are entirely based on surveys of college students who rate their schools on dozens of topics and report on their campus experiences. Students were asked about their professors, school services, campus culture and other facets at their schools.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan students celebrated preparation for post-graduate academics including medical school, graduate school and law school placement. Students ranked highly the individualized attention they receive from their professors.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Once I declared my major, I became part of a family,” said one student. “I know my communication professors better than I knew the teachers at my small, hometown high school.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Students also hailed the popularity of campus events including theatre productions, concerts, sporting events and Greek-sponsored activities. Students also recognized the university’s work to increase diversity and inclusion. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“It’s a small community much like a large family where it’s easy to make friends and feel accepted,” said one student. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The “Best in the Midwest” category includes colleges in 12 states including Iowa, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota and Wisconsin. The complete rankings for NWU can be found on the <a href="https://www.princetonreview.com/college/nebraska-wesleyan-university-1023224?ceid=best-regional">Princeton Review “Midwest” category webpage.</a></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>On August 24, Niche released its 2021 Best Colleges rankings, ranking NWU third among all colleges in Nebraska and second in private colleges.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><a href="https://www.niche.com/colleges/nebraska-wesleyan-university/">Niche rankings</a> are based on analysis of academic, admissions, financial and student life data from the U.S. Department of Education along with reviews from students and alumni. Niche also recognized NWU as the No. 1 best small college in Nebraska, No. 2 best colleges for business in Nebraska, No. 2 best colleges in nursing in Nebraska, No. 3 best value college in Nebraska and No. 3 college with the best student life in Nebraska.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-08-24T20:04:02+00:00">Mon, 08/24/2020 - 3:04pm</span> Mon, 24 Aug 2020 20:04:02 +0000 Sara Olson 614498 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu In An Unprecedented Academic Year, President Good Urges Positivity https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/unprecedented-academic-year-president-good-urges-positivity <span property="schema:name">In An Unprecedented Academic Year, President Good Urges Positivity</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“As we approach the beginning of this extraordinary academic year, this unprecedented academic year, I will suggest to each of you — and to myself — the same four recommendations that I gave to our Class of 2020 graduates,” said Nebraska Wesleyan University President Darrin Good. “Be positive, be persistent, be loving and use your voice.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>That was the advice shared with faculty and staff just prior to the start of the 2020-2021 academic year, which began on August 17. The year started one week early in a hybrid model that allows students to attend most classes in person to best adhere to social distancing protocols. In-person classes will continue until November 23 when students will return home and finish the semester remotely.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In his State of the University Address, Good applauded the task forces that worked tirelessly for the past several months to prepare the campus for the return of students and in-person classes during the COVID-19 pandemic.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I believe us being physically together as a campus community is an essential part of how we deliver this special, high-impact educational experience that creates our amazing alumni,” he said. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Despite an academic year like no other, Good celebrated continued momentum:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span>A first-year class of 433 students. This class is among the most diverse at 17 percent; 20 percent of the first-year students are from out-of-state — the second highest percentage in university history.</span></span></li> <li><span><span>Sixty transfer students were welcomed to NWU. Of the 60 students, 31 percent are students of color; 11 are members of Phi Theta Kappa, an honor society of two-year colleges whose students excel academically; and 22 are Pathways Scholarship students who transferred from a community college that partners with NWU through the Pathways Partnership.</span></span></li> <li><span><span>The university welcomed nine new full-time faculty in the political science, modern languages, nursing, education, art, theatre, math, chemistry and business departments.</span></span></li> <li><span><span>The first phase of the McDonald Theatre renovation is nearing completion. The first phase $1 million renovation includes new seating, a refurbished stage, new heating and cooling and upgraded sound and lighting. Phase one of the renovation was made possible by a grant from The Sunderland Foundation.</span></span></li> <li><span><span>In August, the athletics department announced a new home for the NWU tennis teams. Thanks to the generous support of alumni and friends of the university, the men’s and women’s tennis teams will practice and compete at the Lincoln Sports Foundation Complex, located in north Lincoln. The facility includes four outdoor courts as well as locker rooms and an enclosed viewing area for spectators.</span></span></li> </ul></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-08-24T16:54:35+00:00">Mon, 08/24/2020 - 11:54am</span> Mon, 24 Aug 2020 16:54:35 +0000 Sara Olson 614497 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu NWU Grad Didn't Let Obstacles Stand in Way of Degree https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/nwu-grad-didnt-let-obstacles-stand-way-degree <span property="schema:name">NWU Grad Didn&#039;t Let Obstacles Stand in Way of Degree</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Connor Standridge vividly remembers that winter day when he first toured Nebraska Wesleyan University.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The temperature was mild to most Midwesterners but rather chilly for the Houston, Texas native.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Weather aside, Standridge recognized immediately that NWU was where he wanted to pursue his theatre degree. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“It was a place I could simultaneously relax and push to pursue my own academic interests to the depth of my choosing,” he said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>He credits his family for instilling a passion for theatre and collaboration. It wasn’t long after his arrival in August 2015 when he met Julie Wilshusen, theatre instructor and costume library manager. Together they talked about Standridge’s interest in original music and specialized music performance classes that he’d like to pursue throughout his college career.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>But Standridge’s plan hit a roadbloack.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>A weight room accident that spring left him with a concussion that interfered with his ability to focus on his academics. He made the difficult decision to take some incompletes for his courses and recover at home in Houston. He returned to campus just before the fall semester to finish classes from the previous semester, ready to start strong for his sophomore year.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>But soon after the semester began, Standridge faced another setback — a drug-resistant strep infection that hospitalized him for two weeks. He recovered enough to complete his sophomore year, but the infection aggravated an underlying heart condition, leading to a number of medical complications over the next year. He took a medical withdrawal from NWU during his junior year. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In December 2019, Standridge completed his theatre degree. While his journey came with many challenges, Standridge doesn’t see his experience any different from other students who face challenges along the way.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I’m really lucky to have the family and friends that I do,” said Standridge. “I can say with absolute certainty, I would not have made it this far without them.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I especially owe my brothers in Theta Chi Fraternity for their companionship, understanding, and brotherhood.  Some of the hardest I’ve ever laughed was with those guys and I still routinely call them up today,” he added.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In May, Standridge was selected as this year’s Kenneth R. Holder Award winner, an honor that recognizes a graduating senior who has overcome significant challenges in obtaining their bachelor’s degree.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I’ve routinely heard it said, ‘life is what happens when you are making plans’ and very rarely is our planned path the route that we actually end up taking,” he said. “Rather, one of the things that I think allowed me to overcome the obstacles that I faced was the support from administration and faculty. With their help, I found courses I could take to continue towards my degree while I was away from campus.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Standridge is now back home in Houston where he is pursuing a career in songwriting and producing. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I’m hopeful that once things calm down, I’ll be able to go out and perform in person again,” said Standridge whose performance name is Connor Davis. “But until then I have been trying to write as much as possible and record when the opportunity presents itself. There are even a few of my songs out there on Spotify and iTunes that recently came out.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>And he has his NWU degree to remind him of his possibilities.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Having it framed on the wall is like looking back over and across the cliff face you just climbed,” he said. “It wasn’t easy and it certainly wasn’t always fun, but it was worth it to be able to appreciate the view and say you did it.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p>###</p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><span>—Story by Danielle Anderson, public relations writer.</span></em></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-08-06T18:53:12+00:00">Thu, 08/06/2020 - 1:53pm</span> Thu, 06 Aug 2020 18:53:12 +0000 Sara Olson 610559 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Class of 2020 Grad Honored for Courageous Journey from Zimbabwe to NWU https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/class-2020-grad-honored-courageous-journey-zimbabwe-nwu <span property="schema:name">Class of 2020 Grad Honored for Courageous Journey from Zimbabwe to NWU </span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>It’s been four years since Tecla Nyamakope and her two children immigrated to the United States from Zimbabwe. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Her husband, Charles, immigrated two years earlier, enrolling in a master’s in theology program at Wesleyan Theological Seminary in Washington, D.C. before accepting a pastoral position at the United Methodist Church in Wallace, Neb. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nyamakope was eager to leave a life of loss and struggle. An elementary school teacher with degrees in education and special needs education, she arrived in the southwest Nebraska town of 347 people, ready to start a new life.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>One of the challenges she faced was that her diplomas in Zimbabwe were not equivalent to college degrees in the U.S. Grounded in her Methodist faith, Nyamakope pursued classes at Nebraska Wesleyan University and at MidPlains Community College in North Platte. This time she focused on a degree in social work. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>This meant a 540-mile roundtrip to take classes each week in Lincoln.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“In my country, the majority of the people use public transport such as buses to get from one place to another, which is different from Wallace,” Nyamakope said. “I had to learn how to drive as soon as I arrived in Nebraska.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“My husband would sometimes drive me to Lincoln for my classes and wait for me while reading in the library,” she continued. “We would then drive back home to Wallace after my class ended at 10 p.m. because I would have a class at 8 a.m. the following morning in North Platte.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Family obligations also motivated Nyamakope to make such a long trip in a single day. Her children, ages 13 and 10, needed her as well. Balancing her classes and parenting became a further challenge in September of 2018 when her son broke an ankle playing football and required months of assistance with his recovery. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nyamakope said sacrifices were also made to pay college tuition. While her husband’s paycheck helped with the costs, Nyamakope applied for a work permit and worked a part-time job at night as a housekeeper at Perkins County Hospital, located 31 miles from her home. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In May, Nyamakope’s sacrifices were rewarded with a bachelor’s degree in social work. In addition to her degree, Nebraska Wesleyan recognized her with Dean B. Stewart Award for Courage. This award is presented to a student, staff or faculty member who has displayed remarkable courage in the face of overwhelming odds or barriers.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nyamakope said her NWU degree will open doors to employment and a better means to provide for her extended family who still lives in Zimbabwe. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“My family members’ illnesses alongside my schooling and work were a heavy burden to bear. For tuition and welfare for my late siblings’ children, I play a very important role,” she said. “Some are grown up now, but with the poor economic situation of my native country they still need my support.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Since receiving her degree from Nebraska Wesleyan, Nyamakope has moved with her family to Garden City, Kan., where she is pursuing a social work position and her master’s degree.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“As a helping profession, the social work program prepares learners to help people overcome some of the life’s most difficult social challenges such as poverty, discrimination, abuse, divorce, loss, employment, and educational problems among other challenges,” she said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><em><span><span>—Story by Danielle Anderson, public relations intern.</span></span></em></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-07-31T20:55:05+00:00">Fri, 07/31/2020 - 3:55pm</span> Fri, 31 Jul 2020 20:55:05 +0000 Sara Olson 610505 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Music Professor Wins Instructional Improvement Award https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/music-professor-wins-instructional-improvement-award <span property="schema:name">Music Professor Wins Instructional Improvement Award</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Associate Professor of Music John Spilker has been awarded the Kenneth R. Holder </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Fellowship for Instructional Improvement for 2020-2021.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The fellowship will provide Spilker with the opportunity to attend the three-part ChangeMaker Corps Conference at Prairie Oaks Institute in Minnesota. The conference focuses on adaptive leadership, which he plans to include in his teaching practices. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-06-19T19:55:08+00:00">Fri, 06/19/2020 - 2:55pm</span> Fri, 19 Jun 2020 19:55:08 +0000 Sara Olson 610358 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Religion Professor Named Faculty Advisor of the Year https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/religion-professor-named-faculty-advisor-year <span property="schema:name">Religion Professor Named Faculty Advisor of the Year</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Checking in with students is at the top of Rita Lester’s daily to-do list. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Teaching is the side job,” said Lester, Professor of Religion. “The advising is what I love.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Lester has been named Faculty Advisor of the Year for the 2019-2020 academic year. Student nominators said they see Lester often and when they don’t, they can always expect a message from her in their email inboxes.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“The thought of an advisor who you see once a semester for 20 minutes is foreign to me,” said one student nominator. “If I didn’t see Dr. Lester for a few days, I would get a ‘just checking to see if you are good’ email from her.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Those check-ins proved to be critical last spring when NWU switched to distance learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Lester called each of her advisees during their time away to make certain they were doing ok.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Quite honestly, I don’t know where I would be without Dr. Rita Lester as my academic advisor,” said another student nominator.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-06-19T19:49:59+00:00">Fri, 06/19/2020 - 2:49pm</span> Fri, 19 Jun 2020 19:49:59 +0000 Sara Olson 610356 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Political Science Professor Earns University's Top Teaching Prize https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/political-science-professor-earns-universitys-top-teaching-prize <span property="schema:name">Political Science Professor Earns University&#039;s Top Teaching Prize</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Kelly Bauer opens each class with a question: </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“What is your biggest stressor right now?“ </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“What was the best thing you ate on Thanksgiving?”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The question topics range significantly, but her students greatly appreciate their engaged start to class.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Dr. Bauer is extremely special and is the only person I see winning this award,” said a student who nominated her for the Margaret J. Prouty Faculty Teaching Award — the university’s top teaching prize.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Bauer, assistant professor of political science, began her career at Nebraska Wesleyan in 2015. She </span></span></span><span><span><span><span>teaches introduction to international politics, immigration politics, Latin American politics, human rights, development, research methods and an Archway Seminar. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Earlier this year, she collaborated with three students thanks to the university’s Student Faculty Collaborative Research Grant where they researched immigration rhetoric. They presented their findings at the North Central Council for Latin Americanists Conference where they were recognized with the Collaborative Research Award.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In addition to teaching, Bauer focuses her research on indigenous territorial rights and land policy in Chile. She was selected to present the 2020 Faculty Scholarship Lecture, where she shared her research in Chile. That research also earned her this year’s Faculty Scholar Award. </span></span></span><span><span><span>Her book <em>Mapuche Demands and Chilean Land: Patterns of Governance in Post-Dictatorship Chile</em> is under contract with the U<em>niversity of Pittsburg Press</em>, and portions of the research appear in <em>Journal of Agrarian Change</em> (2016), and <em>Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies</em> (2018).<strong> </strong></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Bauer says conducting this research has influenced her own teaching from thinking about how states respond to demands from citizens to be more inclusive. She said it also challenges her to think about how Nebraska Wesleyan and her own classroom can be more inclusive. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Dr. Kelly Bauer is one of the most intentional, dedicated professors I have had the pleasure and privilege to study under and learn from during my four years at NWU,” said another student nominator. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Previous winners of the Prouty Teaching Award include:</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <ul> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Kelly Clancy, political science, 2018-2019</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Jonathan Redding, religion, 2017-18</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>John Spilker, music, 2016-2017</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Tamra Llewellyn, health and human performance, 2015-2016</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> <li><span><span><span><span><span><span>Angela McKinney, biology, 2014-2015</span></span></span></span></span></span></li> </ul> <p> </p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-06-08T16:17:39+00:00">Mon, 06/08/2020 - 11:17am</span> Mon, 08 Jun 2020 16:17:39 +0000 Sara Olson 610318 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu President Good: Words of Hate Have No Place at NWU https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/president-good-words-hate-have-no-place-nwu <span property="schema:name">President Good: Words of Hate Have No Place at NWU</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>The following message was shared by Nebraska Wesleyan University President Darrin Good with the campus community in response to a recent hate-filled social media post:</em></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I take this opportunity to inform the NWU community that a screenshot of a hateful, disgusting Snapchat post, allegedly written by a Nebraska Wesleyan University student, has circulated on multiple social media platforms in recent days.  As your President and speaking on behalf of Nebraska Wesleyan University, we unequivocally and vehemently condemn the language used in this post: it was hate-filled, racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and antithetical to NWU values.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We take such matters very seriously. The Prairie Wolf Promise and Code of Student Conduct call upon students to be “<span><span>just and equitable in their treatment of all members of the community.”  We take seriously the university’s obligation to act quickly and decisively when a student is found responsible for violations of the Code of Student Conduct. We appreciate all who brought this posting to the university’s attention. I assure you that the university is vigorously responding to this situation.</span></span>  We have initiated an investigation to quickly address this detestable post.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I, also, want to apologize for our delay in responding in an official capacity via a Nebraska Wesleyan University email to the entire community.  Though I responded immediately on Twitter as President of the University from <span><span>@NWU_President </span></span><span><span>and </span></span><span><span>@NEWesleyan </span></span><span><span>responded on Twitter as well</span></span><span>, I clearly see now that this was insufficient</span>.  I apologize and take full responsibility for the delay this has caused in communicating via email to all students, faculty and staff. In no way was this an attempt to sweep the matter under the rug and we, as a university, should have published sooner an official response against this disgusting social media post. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Here, I share my tweet in response to those who tagged me, “<span><span>Sincerely, thanks for informing me about this revolting post. It is racist, misogynistic, homophobic AND has absolutely NO place at NWU. It goes against everything I stand for personally and the Core Values of NWU. We are already working to take actions to address this situation.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I have been in dialogue with student government leaders and others on campus to help me <span>understand how our response has fallen short.  We also had a poignant and well attended event on Friday hosted by Wendy Hunt (Assistant Director of Diversity and Inclusion) and Antwan Wilson (Distinguished Visiting Professor of Education) to discuss issues around racism, police brutality and how we can improve Nebraska Wesleyan.  From that townhall discussion, it was clear that improvements need to be made.  As an institution of higher learning, Nebraska Wesleyan exists as a deeply interconnected community rooted in learning and love and we, therefore, must </span>implement changes.  I vow to redouble our efforts and work with the campus leadership among students, staff, and faculty to not simply respond with more words and promises, but with actions!</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>To be unmistakably clear, Nebraska Wesleyan WILL NOT tolerate hate speech.  We will aggressively work to identify individuals who violate the Student Code of Conduct in ways that attack our deeply-rooted commitment to social justice.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan WILL create more opportunities for the difficult conversations that will lead to becoming an antiracist campus community.  We will do so through additional programs, funding, curriculum, spaces (virtual and physical) and policies that put into action what is needed. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan MUST create a campus where each individual feels more than “welcomed” by the majority or those with privilege, but we must be a university where each person can feel they “belong.” </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nebraska Wesleyan University and I, personally, stand in support of Black Lives Matter, of becoming an antiracist campus community, and of intentionally infusing a deep commitment to social justice in our campus community, our city, and the world.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Sincerely,</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span><br /> <span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>President Good</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-06-06T18:59:25+00:00">Sat, 06/06/2020 - 1:59pm</span> Sat, 06 Jun 2020 18:59:25 +0000 Sara Olson 610316 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Let Love Overwhelm Fear at NWU and Everywhere https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/let-love-overwhelm-fear-nwu-and-everywhere <span property="schema:name">Let Love Overwhelm Fear at NWU and Everywhere</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><em>Nebraska Wesleyan University President Darrin Good issued this statement on nationwide unrest following the George Floyd tragedy.</em></p> <p><em>Let Love Overwhelm Fear at NWU and Everywhere — June 1, 2020</em></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Dear Nebraska Wesleyan Community,</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I feel moved to convey to you personally and as President of Nebraska Wesleyan University my condemnation of the actions of the four Minneapolis police officers who senselessly and needlessly ended the life of George Floyd. <span>This is yet another racist act of violence that has highlighted the deep-seated fears that exist in the Black community. As we have all been witnessing, this has been a tipping point igniting protests and </span>calls for action.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Each individual on this earth is unique, special and deserving of human rights as well as human dignity. This is what we believe at our University and what we teach in and outside the classrooms. I promise to you that we will continue to be an institution that champions diversity, equity and inclusion in our actions, our policies and our moral ethos. We abhor the toxic effects of generations of systemic racism in the United States and the dangerous effects of individuals in positions of power making decisions based upon stereotypes and prejudices. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In our pain and anger, we must be careful not to not fall into the same trap of simplistic thinking by stereotyping police officers. We proudly recognize among our NWU alumni, friends and family members many police officers who are fair-minded and humane. We should not categorize all police officers based upon the horrific and indefensible behavior of a few. Rather, Nebraska Wesleyan can and will continue to be a thoughtful institution where we learn about systemic prejudice, abuse of power and social justice. <span>It is my hope that Nebraska Wesleyan University will not simply acknowledge the work we must do to move toward implementing and upholding anti-racist policies and practices within our own institution, but be a source of change to the world, the nation and our local communities.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>I do not want to silence voices. That is not my intent. I support non-violent protests. However, what we are witnessing across the nation and in our backyards in Lincoln and Omaha exemplifies that violence and looting are not the answers to this problem; love, education and working together are the tools for the necessary path forward. We need to understand how and why we arrived at this point and how we begin to make reparations. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>We each have unconscious biases that must be kept in check through policies and practices that can work to mitigate and reduce the impact of these biases. As a community of scholars and humanitarians, Nebraska Wesleyan must continue being a place where we intentionally work to change systemic problems in our society including law enforcement structures that allow “bad cops” to remain and even be promoted to positions of power within those police forces.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Numerous times since I have been a member of this wonderful University, I have shared my deeply held personal and professional commitment to create an environment rooted in celebrating diversity, equity and inclusion. We must now redouble our efforts and pledge that Nebraska Wesleyan will be a campus that does more than simply create a<em> “welcoming environment”</em> for individuals from underrepresented groups; rather we must create a <strong>community where every individual feels that they <em>belong and are valued</em></strong>. I invite each of you to look into your heart and your mind and imagine how you can do more and be better as a person. Join me in being an agent of change to create a Nebraska Wesleyan that truly lives out our values.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In 1913 Mohandas Gandhi wrote: “We but mirror the world. All the tendencies present in the outer world are to be found in the world of our body. If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change.” We, therefore, </span></span>must be the change we want to see in the world. Let’s start working with love on that change by discussing as a Nebraska Wesleyan community how we envision that change. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>In Community With You,</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>President Good</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-06-01T15:09:14+00:00">Mon, 06/01/2020 - 10:09am</span> Mon, 01 Jun 2020 15:09:14 +0000 Sara Olson 610289 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Fall Semester to Begin One Week Early https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/fall-semester-begin-one-week-early <span property="schema:name">Fall Semester to Begin One Week Early</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p>Nebraska Wesleyan University will begin the fall semester in person on Monday, August 17 — one week earlier than originally planned.</p> <p>Classes will continue on campus until the week of November 23 when the residence halls will close and students will return home for the Thanksgiving holiday. Classes will not be held November 23-27.</p> <p>The final week of classes will be held remotely November 30-December 4 and will include lectures, small group discussions and instruction of new material. Final exams will be given remotely December 7-11.</p> <p>Students will return to campus when the spring semester starts on Monday, January 11.</p> <p>"Following many discussions with members of the Academic Task Force and the Administrative Council, we feel strongly that these adjustments will not only allow us to be together in person for nearly all of the fall semester, but they will also help us to respond effectively to a potential second wave of COVID-19 next winter," said Darrin Good, president of Nebraska Wesleyan University.</p> <p>"<span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Our hope is that we can protect the health of our entire campus community by significantly reducing travel to and from campus during the semester and particularly between Thanksgiving and spring semester," he continued. "We can reduce exposure and the spread of infection while maintaining our deep commitment to excellence, personal attention and student success."</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Labor Day will still be a holiday for faculty, staff and students but no fall break is scheduled for the semester. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The university will share plans in mid-June regarding fall classes; student experiences including housing, athletics and recreation, student activities and student support; and operational measures, specifically safety in the social spaces, labs, classrooms and offices.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-05-26T21:39:00+00:00">Tue, 05/26/2020 - 4:39pm</span> Tue, 26 May 2020 21:39:00 +0000 Sara Olson 610282 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Two NWU Students Win Prestigious Fulbright Scholarships https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/two-nwu-students-win-prestigious-fulbright-scholarships <span property="schema:name">Two NWU Students Win Prestigious Fulbright Scholarships</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Two recent Nebraska Wesleyan University graduates have received the prestigious Fulbright Scholarship.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Alison Greenfield of Murray, Neb., and Sam Trofholz of Columbus, Neb., have been awarded the Fulbright Scholarship, the flagship international education exchange program sponsored by the U.S. government.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Greenfield’s scholarship would have taken her to Indonesia for a year. Her travel has been cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. She said she selected Indonesia for its beauty, linguistics and ethnic and religious diversity. Last spring, Greenfield studied in Preston, England at the University of Central Lancashire. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Through that experience, I traveled the world by myself and made such close friendships with the people I lived with,” said Greenfield, an English major who earned her degree in May. “I had such an amazing experience.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Greenfield plans to return to England before pursuing a degree in counseling. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Trofholz will travel to Germany in January where he will spend a year as an English teaching assistant. The international studies major was first inspired by a high school German teacher who made each lesson unique. He is also interested in his family tree with many of his ancestors coming from Germany. Last summer he studied at the <span>Katholische Universität Eichstätt-Ingolstadt in Bavaria, Germany.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“My time abroad helped me become a more independent individual, whether I was navigating public transportation, or finding new places to shop and eat,” said Trofholz, who earned his degree in May. “After this experience I have been able to have a better understanding of what it means to really immerse myself into a different culture and language.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Greenfield and Trofholz’s awards bring NWU’s total Fulbright Scholarship count to 59.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-05-20T21:32:24+00:00">Wed, 05/20/2020 - 4:32pm</span> Wed, 20 May 2020 21:32:24 +0000 Sara Olson 610270 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Playwriting Class Helps Children Make Sense of Pandemic https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/playwriting-class-helps-children-make-sense-pandemic <span property="schema:name">Playwriting Class Helps Children Make Sense of Pandemic</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Like other NWU professors, Rebecca Boesen found herself in unfamiliar territory when she was asked to pivot mid-semester into a distance-learning model.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Boesen approached the new challenge first with caution and concern for students enrolled in her Playwriting II course.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Then the theatre instructor used her students’ wellbeing to influence a new direction for her course. She wanted to make it memorable and influential for her students who were now away from the bright lights and big stage of McDonald Theatre that they had become so familiar with.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“We made lemonade out of COVID-19 lemons,” said Boesen.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Boesen’s challenge to her students was to write a short play for young audiences, specifically one that addresses the anxieties and experiences that children are processing during this epidemic. The plays would be submitted and considered for a performance produced by Blixt Locally Grown, a Lincoln-based organization committed to improving the lives of children and families through the arts. Boesen is co-founder and vice president of the organization. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Nine plays were submitted and all were strong contenders, said Boesen. Utimately, Claire Opheim’s play, “Captain Soapman,” was selected for production. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Opheim — who goes by the pen name, Mary Sinclair, understands how easy it is to get caught up in the woes of uncertainty; however, the time is even more confusing for children who are often left out of the loop of information,” she said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“It’s important for kids to understand the situation but not live in fear,” said Opheim, a sophomore theatre studies major from Bennington, Neb. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Her play embraces humor, heart, and hope to honor the experience of children everywhere who are processing the big changes that come with the COVID-19 pandemic. In the play, an eight-year-old boy named Michael is anxious when an army of hostile germs kidnap his favorite toy. Eventually he uses soap to fight off the evil germs that enter his room. His fear is addressed and overcome with the help of his parents. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I physicalized the germs for children to understand their presence but also to give them a sense of power to fight against the illness,” said Opheim.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Providing a sense of hope was a major factor in her writing.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Too often, children feel helpless or small because of their age,” she said. “But I made Michael the superhero “Captain Soapman” to show other kids that they can be just as helpful and powerful during scary times.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Opheim’s interpretation of reality made her play stand out among the rest for its entertaining and educational approach. Including themes of grief as well, Blixt Locally Grown knew this was the piece they would produce. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“For several years now, Blixt Locally Grown has been working alongside Mourning Hope Grief Center and various schools and communities on utilizing theatre as a powerful way to address grief. Claire's play was right up our alley,” Boesen explained. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Produced entirely via Zoom video-conferencing so actors and crew could maintain social distancing, Opheim says the experience has been a dream come true. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I have always dreamed of having a play produced, but to have this happen so fast and so soon is so incredible,” she said. “Becky [Boesen] and Petra (Wahlqvist, president and co-founder of Blixt Locally Grown) have put in so much work and treat this show with so much respect that I couldn’t be more pleased with the experience. They have put together an amazing team of creative artists who are making this show more than I even imagined.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Boesen hopes her students finished the playwriting course with a new confidence in translating their own thoughts about the COVID-19 pandemic as well as experience in writing short plays for young audiences, inevitably creating self-awareness and the ability to find their voices as playwrights. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Opheim plans to make a career of playwriting and potentially run her own small theatre, working with children’s and conventional adult theatre. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Captain Soapman” premiers May 15 on the <a href="http://www.blixt.space/#/">Blixt Locally Grown</a> website. The website also features additional submissions by the NWU class.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>###</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><em><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Story by Danielle Anderson, public relations writer.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></em></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-05-15T16:34:33+00:00">Fri, 05/15/2020 - 11:34am</span> Fri, 15 May 2020 16:34:33 +0000 Sara Olson 610262 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Senior Sweeps State, Regional and National Athletic Training Awards https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/senior-sweeps-state-regional-and-national-athletic-training-awards <span property="schema:name">Senior Sweeps State, Regional and National Athletic Training Awards</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Call her the triple crown winner of athletic training.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Kelsey Jaeschke has capped off her senior year as just the second Nebraska Wesleyan University student to sweep state, regional and national honors in her field.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Jaeschke, of Kenesaw, Neb., has won the Nebraska State Athletic Training Scholarship, the Mid-America Athletic Training Scholarship, and the National Athletic Training Scholarship. The senior also earned the Chuck Kimmel First Time Attendee National Scholarship at the 2019 National Athletic Training Association convention. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Each scholarship required multiple letters of recommendation,” said Jaeschke who acknowledged all of the university’s athletic trainers and faculty who helped her along the way. “They were always there to take time out of their day to help me. I couldn’t have done it without any of them.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Jaeschke has always dreamed of becoming a physical therapist, but realized that pursuing an athletic training degree first would allow her to achieve that goal in a way that would optimize a hands-on approach. A three-sport athlete in high school, she recalled how her own high school shared an athletic trainer with nine other conference schools. Accustomed to the standard first aid, buckets of ice, and tape jobs by her coaches, Jaeschke realized that athletic training is important and necessary. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>At Nebraska Wesleyan University, Jaeschke was first exposed to the athletic training program as a member of the women’s basketball team where she often spent more time with trainers than on the court. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Spending practices with both the certified trainers and students, I learned what they all liked and disliked. But more importantly, they taught me a new way of learning,” Jaeschke said. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>She wasted no time gaining professional experience. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“I made sure to be present in the program so that I could experience all parts of the profession,” she said. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>At NWU she assisted the football, volleyball, men’s basketball, cross country, track &amp; field, and baseball and softball teams. Off campus, she gained clinical experience with Lincoln East High School’s fall sports teams and the Lincoln Youth Football League. Additionally, she spent a summer working for Varsity Spirit where she traveled across the United States to provide first aid for cheer and dance camps and competitions. Last summer, she participated in a similar experience at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>While gaining professional experience, Jaeschke also developed her leadership skills, serving as vice president and then president of NWU’s Athletic Training Student Association.  </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“They forced me out of my comfort zone, allowing me to be a leader in my program,” she said.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Jaeschke’s triple honors follows on the footsteps of 2017 graduate Kelsey Bahe, who was the first student in the state to win all three athletic training honors. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“When I started the AT program, I would have never guessed the success I have encountered,” said Jaeschke. “I’m not sure many other students have accomplished this so the fact that NWU has had two students with so much success, is amazing. It says a lot about the quality of our program.”</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Jaeschke now heads to the College of Saint Mary in Omaha, Neb., where he will attend graduate school for physical therapy. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p>###</p> <p><em>Story by Danielle Anderson, public relations intern</em></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-04-17T17:11:54+00:00">Fri, 04/17/2020 - 12:11pm</span> Fri, 17 Apr 2020 17:11:54 +0000 Sara Olson 609713 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu Bunstock Recognized for Contributions to Community https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu/about-nwu/news-center/bunstock-recognized-contributions-community <span property="schema:name">Bunstock Recognized for Contributions to Community</span> <div property="schema:text" class="field field--name-body field--type-text-with-summary field--label-hidden field--item"><p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Assistant Athletic Director Jo Bunstock has been recognized with the university’s CORE Award for her dedication to building community. </span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>The CORE Award recognizes a staff member whose efforts and contributions significantly exceed expectations in demonstrating or promoting Nebraska Wesleyan’s core values: excellence, liberal arts, personal attention to students, diversity, community, and stewardship.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>“Jo Bunstock has certainly gone way beyond expectations in her job in promoting community on our campus and beyond,” said Athletic Director Ira Zeff.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>Bunstock was celebrated for organizing an annual Red Ribbon Day on campus for nearby Huntington Elementary School students. The event, which has brought hundreds of students to campus over the past 20 years, includes a pep rally and sports clinics put on by NWU student athletes.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p> <p><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span><span>For the past 26 years, Bunstock has organized Thanksgiving meals for Huntington Elementary School families who might not otherwise be able to celebrate a holiday feast . Bunstock helps organize university offices, student organizations, athletic teams and individuals who provide everything needed for a traditional Thanksgiving meal. The food drive feeds over 90 families each year.</span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></span></p></div> <span rel="schema:author"><a title="View user profile." href="/campus-directory/sara-olson" lang="" about="/campus-directory/sara-olson" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Sara Olson</a></span> <span property="schema:dateCreated" content="2020-04-07T21:49:00+00:00">Tue, 04/07/2020 - 4:49pm</span> Tue, 07 Apr 2020 21:49:00 +0000 Sara Olson 609491 at https://www.nebrwesleyan.edu