Nebraska Wesleyan Remembers French Professor Tony Epp

A long-time Nebraska Wesleyan University French professor has died. Professor Emeritus Anthony Epp died Monday, June 6. He was 69.

Epp taught at Nebraska Wesleyan University for 34 years, retiring in May 2005. Prior to coming to Nebraska Wesleyan, Epp taught at Sundi-Lutete in the Republic of Congo and at the University of Colorado. At NWU, he taught courses in French and German as well as Liberal Arts Seminars for first-year students.

But his impact on campus went well beyond the classroom. He attended and supported numerous student art shows, plays, concerts, athletics events, and was a member of Men’s Glee. In 2003, he was honored with the “Spirit of the Plainsman” Award. Epp spearheaded the faculty and staff drive to acquire an Imperial Grand Bosendorfer piano for Nebraska Wesleyan — the only one of its kind in Nebraska and one of 70 such instruments in the United States. He worked with the Student Affairs Senate to create the Wesleyan Wall of Scholars, which is now proudly displayed in Great Hall of the Smith-Curtis Administration Building. He was also instrumental in generating a successful faculty and staff fundraising campaign for Nebraska Public Radio.

Shortly after his retirement, he and his wife, Dianne, moved to North Newton, Kansas.

A memorial service will be held Monday, August 15 at 11 a.m. at Bethel College Mennonite Church in North Newton, Kan.

Continuing his legacy

I had the joy of being in Dr. Epp's Int. French class as a freshman. My best memories, other than reading "The Little Prince" in French, was French-only dinners with his family. He and his wife made us feel at home and part of the Wesleyan family. When my son began his Wesleyan career as a biology major a few years ago, he joined Men's Glee and one day called to say the baritone section was invited to Dr. Epp's for dinner. How great to know that tradition of Wesleyan family welcome was still going on at the Epp's! I am currently teaching 5th grade in a high poverty, multicultural district and am applying the relationship principal that Dr. Epp taught by example. Small groups of my students are invited to join me for lunch each Friday just to talk, sometimes to practice their English, and mostly to build relationship. I hope they, in-turn, will carry on the tradition when they are adults. My thanks to his family for sharing Dr. Epp with all of us. He will be missed and fondly remembered.

Great Man

Tony added a great deal to the fabric of the Wesleyan community. Not only was he a great teacher he took great interest in students life outside the classroom. He developed close relationships with several of our Track & Field student-athletes. He even travelled to Indiana one year to the NCAA Indoor Track & Field Championship @ DePauw University to watch all of our team compete but especially Lee Seberger whom Tony had a close relationship. The team did great and Lee actually won the National Championship in the triple jump. Tony was absolutely thrilled and from then on always brought up that trip when ever we saw each other.

Tony's caring, insightful and gentle manner will be greatly missed.

Tony, you will be missed

I think fondly of Tony whenever I think of my time at Wesleyan. Not only did you introduce me to the joys of a liberal arts education, which I try to give to my own students, but you got my German up-to-speed for my Fulbright. You were inspirational in so many ways. I try to follow your example an be both mentor and friend to my students. My sympathy to your family.

Tony, you will be missed

I think fondly of Tony whenever I think of my time at Wesleyan. Not only did you introduce me to the joys of a liberal arts education, which I try to give to my own students, but you got my German up-to-speed for my Fulbright. You were inspirational in so many ways. I try to follow your example an be both mentor and friend to my students. My sympathy to your family.

Tony

Tony is the epitome of a student -focused professor. Students, no matter what their discipline or interest, were important to Tony. He inspired me to always be a better teacher. I loved being around him. He exemplifies the spirit of NWU. He will be missed.

A remarkable man. Before I

A remarkable man. Before I set foot at NWU, Dr. Epp had sent me letters in high school trying explaining why NWU was the place to be. I still have those letters. He had a wide array of hobbies and interests that were so very unique. His wife is also a very precious educator and our thoughts are with her at this time as well. He will be so missed.

Tony Epp

Tony shared with us so much more than the subjects he taught. He taught us about kindness, life and the love for people. I will always remember Tony and his wife for bringing us into their homes on multiple occasions for dinner and great conversation.

Thank you for sharing your life with all of us at NWU. You will surely be missed.

Tony

I remember the campaign for the Bosendorfer and when it finally arrived. Tony was one of a kind. He will be very much missed.

Sad news

Dr. Epp was a one of a kind light in this world that will be deeply missed.

Dr. Epp was a truly

Dr. Epp was a truly remarkable man who had an incredible influence on my life. So many of my memories of Wesleyan revolve around him, from LAS to Kaffeestunde to Deutsches Wochenende to pursuing and receiving a Fulbright Scholarship in Germany, where I met my husband - I am eternally grateful for everything he did for me.

Godspeed Tony

Tony Epp was the best teacher in the history of the calling. I signed up for German as a freshman just to get it out of the way. But his class and his joie-de-vivre led to German and French minors, a Fulbright and an enduring friendship. "Let's-get-it-outta-the-way" turned into a life-changing bit of dumb-luck because of Tony.

Recalling a thousand great memories tonight... Godspeed Tony.

French

What a great man. Great Teacher. Loved his spirit. Much remembered professor. All my sympathy to his close friends and family.

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Professor emeritus Dr. Tony Epp taught French and German at NWU for 34 years.