First Semester Schedule Questionnaire

Welcome to Nebraska Wesleyan University. Please fill out this questionnaire to aid us in preparing your first semester schedule and submit as soon as possible for priority registration.

After you have submitted this online form, you will receive a confirmation at the email address you provide below. If you do not receive an email, please contact the Admissions Office at NWU as soon as possible. Thank you.

This was in the email from the Admissions Office.

If you do not have an email address, please contact your Admissions Representative.

Academic Interests

Nebraska Wesleyan encourages you to explore a wide range of academic areas before you declare a major. You may, however, already have in mind some general area(s) of academic interest. Please check the statement below that best describes you:

For example: health professions (medicine, nursing, PT, etc.), law, social work, writing, visual/performing arts, business, teaching, counseling, etc.
Modern Languages

Have you taken a Modern Language in high school? Please indicate the language below and how many years you have taken of this language.

If you have taken Spanish, French, or German in high school, we require you to take the Modern Language Assessment to find out which level would be appropriate for you at NWU. (You will still have the option to begin a new language if you prefer.)

Mathematics
Class Schedule

To assist us in creating your class schedule, please check the boxes next to the liberal education area(s) in which you would be most interested in taking courses during your first semester. Please choose a minimum of three areas. (All first-year students will take an Archway Seminar and first-year writing.)

Your specific course will depend upon your ACT Math Score and your academic interest.
Your specific course will depend upon your language interest and the results of your Modern Language Assessment.
Courses involve participation in creative writing, visual arts, or performing arts.
Courses emphasize scientific methods of understanding human behavior.
Courses emphasize scientific methods of understanding the natural world.
First-Year Seminar preferences

Instructions: Each first year student is enrolled in one Fall Archway Seminar, a four-credit class. Based on your interests, please select your top 5-10 Archway Seminar choices from the list below. You may select up to 5 bottom choices if you wish. Your Summer Advisor will use this information to build your schedule, prior to meeting with you at New Student Registration.

TopNeutralBottom
Jazz and American Culture
This course asks who makes decisions about the value of a cultural form and on what basis, taking as its example the changing status of jazz in America over the last 100 years. Read more
Jazz and American Culture

Jazz music has traveled a long way toward respectability in a short period of time. In 1921 the Ladies Home Journal asked, “Does Jazz Put the Sin in Syncopation?” and confirmed soon after that indeed, “the Road to Hell is too often paved with jazz steps.” Fifty-seven years later, at a jazz recital on the White House lawn, President Jimmy Carter declared “this concert is just as much a part of the greatness of America as the White House or the Capitol building down the street.” Our course asks who makes decisions about the value of a cultural form and on what basis, using the changing status of jazz as its example. Key themes include:

  • the music’s African American origins
  • the development of esoteric performance styles
  • the growing significance of experts in interpreting the music
  • attempts to modify audience behavior by changing the performance setting
  • institutional forces for change within the music business
  • the expansion of nonprofit sponsorship

Science for the People: Communication, Engagement, and Activism in Science
In this transdisciplinary course, we will critically evaluate the role scientists play in society by considering the concepts of science communication, public engagement, citizen science, and social justice. Read more
Science for the People: Communication, Engagement, and Activism in Science

Few people know the radical science movement of the 1970s and 1980s in the United States, or that many scientists during the 1940s and 1950s were Marxist or socialist thinkers, like Albert Einstein. From the beginning, science was for and by the people. However, that has changed over time as science has become more conservative in nature and has separated itself from the public. Given new developments in science and technology and their ethical and social implications, there is now a renewed push for scientists to engage with the public. In this course, we will look at how the involvement of scientists with the public has changed and ask: Who is the public? What is science communication and public engagement? Who benefits from this interaction? Why is it important for scientists to engage with the public? What are the potential challenges? Do scientists have a special obligation to society? By addressing these questions, we will have a better understanding of the complex relationship between the scientific community and the rest of society as well as reflect on the emancipatory possibilities of science.

On Looking: The Art of Observation
In this seminar, we will learn how much there is to see when we look through an expert’s eyes. Read more
On Looking: The Art of Observation

In On Looking: A Walker’s Guide to the Art of Observation, author Alexandra Horowitz shows us how much there is to see in the world around us. We’ll follow her as she walks with experts on a range of subjects, including a geologist, a sound designer and an urban sociologist. We’ll also walk with some local experts and learn what they have to teach as about what they see, how they see it, and why most of us do not see the same things, even in places we think we know well.

Blowin’ in the Wind: Self and Society in the Life of Bob Dylan
In this course, we will use Bob Dylan’s life to look at the American society that shaped him, and to see what that will tell us about his art, his identity, and the development of American popular culture from the 1960s to today. Read more
Blowin’ in the Wind: Self and Society in the Life of Bob Dylan

Bob Dylan is one of the single most influential musical artists of the last century, and also one of the most mystified and mystifying. From his emergence as a folk singer in New York City in the early 1960s he was constantly inventing and reinventing himself in reaction to the world around him, and his public was constantly finding in him what they wanted to find. But who is he really? In this course, we will use his life to look at the American society that shaped him, and to see what that will tell us about his art, his identity, and the development of American popular culture from the 1960s to today.

Coffee, Cake and the “Kiss”: Vienna at the dawn of the 20th Century
Coffee, Cake and the "Kiss": Vienna at the dawn of the 20th Century. Read more
Coffee, Cake and the “Kiss”: Vienna at the dawn of the 20th Century

Allan Janik, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Innsbruck and author of Wittgenstein’s Vienna, has called the Vienna of this period “the Silicon Valley of the Mind”. Rarely has so much talent in fields ranging from literature, art, architecture and music to economics, politics, science and psychology inhabited a single place and time, and with such ramifications for the century to come, standing on the cusp of the first World War. And where was all this so hotly debated? In the Viennese coffeehouses, where coffee was “not the ends, but the means” (Hans Wiegel). We will enter this world through the works of Rainer Maria Rilke (Letters to a Young Artist), Arthur Schnitzler (Circles or The Blue Room), Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Stefan Zweig, Ludwig von Wittgenstein, even the Empress Elisabeth, as well as artists such as Gustav Klimt and his Kiss, as well as architects, composers, and others in areas of interest to the students enrolled in the course. Our focus will be on issues of love, sex, relationships, communication, and on how the issues of this time continue to inform the world we live in today.

Joy of Sects
This seminar explores how religious movements born in the modern era (such as Mormonism, Rastafari, Scientology, Wicca and others) construct authority using transcendent sources, proclaimed hagiographies and lineages, founding texts, strategic identity building and boundary negotiations. Read more
Joy of Sects

Instead of debating the truth or falsity of any aspect of any religion (new or old, living or dead), this seminar explores how religious movements born in the modern era construct authority using transcendent sources, proclaimed hagiographies and lineages, founding texts, strategic identity building and boundary negotiations. Although many religion courses act as if only ancient (but not dead) religions are worth studying, not only are many religious customs recent innovations, newer religions can just as clearly, maybe more clearly, illustrate how religious traditions and identities are constructed. Newer religious movements considered include Rastafari, Mormonism, Scientology, and Wicca, but other less well known newer religions and some well known World Religions will be used for illustration and comparison.

Enduring Humanity
Students in this course will examine how the Star Trek phenomenon has reflected and influenced culture in the U.S. and informed us about the human condition. Read more
Enduring Humanity

What does science fiction tell us about the human condition? Since the inception of television shows such as The Twilight Zone (1959-1964) and Lost in Space (1965-1968), audiences have confronted many enduring questions, such as what it means to be human. Gene Roddenberry, futurist and creator of the Star Trek series, tackled some of the greatest social and political questions of his day. He hired the first multicultural cast and aired the first interracial kiss. Roddenberry credited Star Trek’s enduring success “to the show’s positive message of hope for a better tomorrow,” as the first series to depict a peaceful future. Students in this course will examine historical and cultural settings as we view episodes from the original Star Trek series (1960s) and The Next Generation (1980s and 90s), as well as the spinoff series Deep Space 9, Voyager, and Enterprise, to understand how the Star Trek phenomenon has reflected “American” culture and informed us about the human condition.

Songs of Ascent: The Music and Meaning of U2
This course will examine the history, music, and influence of the Irish rock group U2. Read more
Songs of Ascent: The Music and Meaning of U2

In the history of rock and roll few acts have had the longevity, popularity, and impact of U2. This course will trace the musical journey of U2 from their humble beginnings in Dublin, Ireland in the 1970s, to selling out stadiums around the world today. Along the way we will examine U2’s diverse musical catalog, their critical and commercial highs and lows, as well as the social consciousness exhibited in their songs and activism.

Liberating identities: Gender and Sexuality in International Contexts
Defining gender and desire can be a prison sentence or a declaration of independence, depending on one’s environment; media representations of sex and LGBTQI orientations manifest both oppression and liberation in various cultures. Read more
Liberating identities: Gender and Sexuality in International Contexts

Feminist theorists once argued that the gaze is male; subsequent thinkers posited a queer gaze. For three decades, queer theory has explored the complexities of gender, sexual orientation, desire, and identity. Communities across the globe have questioned heteronormative restrictions; visual media in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Europe and Latin America depict various definitions and expressions of liberation. Inundated with images of gender roles and expectations, how do educated spectators respond? Synthesizing information from visual and other texts, students will be expected to evaluate and critique constructions of gender, including gender expression, gender performance and culturally specific representations of gender.

Midcentury Madness: Advertising, Sex(ism), and Cigarettes
This Archway Seminar takes a look at American life and culture, through AMC’s critically acclaimed television show Mad Men. Read more
Midcentury Madness: Advertising, Sex(ism), and Cigarettes

New York City: circa 1960. The sharply-dressed Account Managers and Creative Staff at the Madison Avenue firm Sterling Cooper drink Scotch before noon, chain smoke, chase and catch shapely secretaries. Domesticity and pastel-draped suburban life appear tranquil and fulfilling, but foster simmering resentment. This Archway Seminar takes a look at American life and culture, through AMC’s critically acclaimed television show Mad Men.

The Examined Life
In this course, students will examine their own lives through the study of some classic philosophical texts, literature and film. Read more
The Examined Life

Socrates famously claims that the unexamined life is not worth living. This course is designed to provide the opportunity for students to philosophically examine their own lives through a close textual analysis and discussion of some of the philosophers who engaged in this very activity at some point in their lives. This discussion will lead us into variously fascinating areas of philosophical interest, including metaphysics (e.g. the nature of the soul and moral values such as piety), the study of knowledge, language and religion. Students will be asked to reflect on these issues both in understanding these philosophies and as a platform for examining their own lives and times.

Hamlet
We will conduct a semester-long investigation of the text, background, and significance of Shakespeare’s most famous play. Read more
Hamlet

Ordinarily, a class would not take a whole semester to study one play, but Hamlet is not an ordinary play. In addition to reading and discussing the play (which will involve the question of which version of the play should be seen as definitive), we will look at the play’s sources, its literary context (revenge tragedy and the development of English blank verse), its political context (the end of Queen Elizabeth’s reign and anxiety over her succession), and its intellectual context (Machiavelli, Montaigne, Castiglione). We will look at the interpretations Hamlet has inspired over the centuries, and at ways it has been performed, and at some of the ways contemporary writers like Tom Stoppard and Margaret Atwood have reshaped it into new original works.

Atheism
The course will be an introduction to the academic study of atheism organized around basic questions such as “can an atheist have morals?” and “what does science have to say about the existence of God(s)?” Read more
Atheism

This course will be an introduction to the academic study of atheism designed for the intellectually curious student. Readings and class discussion will be organized around basic but productive questions such as: What is atheism? What are the arguments for and against the existence of God? What is the place of God in science? What can science tell us about religion and faith? Can an atheist have ethics or live a moral life? How is atheism represented in art? What is behind the rise of the so-called “New Atheism”? In exploring answers to these questions, we will take an interdisciplinary approach, reading widely from philosophy, the physical sciences, the social sciences, autobiography, and literature.

The Way We Were? Memory, Conflict, and the Self
Learn how philosophers, psychologists, historians, neuroscientists, and poets have contributed to a deeper understanding of memory, a gift that can be as vexing as it is valuable. Read more
The Way We Were? Memory, Conflict, and the Self

Think of your most cherished memories. If you lost access to them, would you still be the same person? We build our identities on the foundation of memory, but that foundation is far from perfect. We misremember, we exaggerate, and we forget. Memory shapes our interactions with each other too. If individuals, or nations, disagree about their shared past, how can they iron out their differences? Why are memorials to the past so often controversial? In this Archway Seminar, we will consider these questions and more as we reflect on the power of memory, humankind’s most valuable and problematic asset.

James Bond: The Man, the Icon, the World Is Not Enough
This course will focus on the myth and lore of James Bond, the influence of pop culture on the Bond world and vice versa, and the impact of political and economic events on the evolution of the James Bond franchise. Read more
James Bond: The Man, the Icon, the World Is Not Enough

Bond. James Bond. This introduction is arguably one of the most recognizable and celebrated utterances in the history of popular culture. The James Bond name conjures a multitude of diverse and exotic sights, sounds, and sentiments. Why has Bond endured as an icon for so many years? This course will explore and dissect both the literary and cinematic worlds of James Bond, aiming to understand his many incarnations as reflections of the eras in which they were crafted. By the end of the course, students will be well versed in the myth and lore of James Bond, the influence of pop culture on the Bond world and vice versa, and the impact of political and economic events on the evolution of the James Bond franchise.

The Power of Words
In this class, we will consider language from various angles and explore the ways language is important in many fields (law, marketing, education, politics, psychology, and more). Read more
The Power of Words

Language is one of humans’ defining characteristics. Words have the power to make friends or enemies. A shared language can unite diverse people, but abusive speech can harm others. In this class, we will consider language from various angles and explore the ways language is important in many fields (law, marketing, education, politics, psychology, and more). Given our broad and flexible topic, students will have both the freedom and the responsibility of focusing assignments according to their personal, academic, and professional interests. Bring an open mind and your favorite words!

The Dinner Party
This course will focus on women and their role in history as well as the social and institutional obstacles they have encountered. Read more
The Dinner Party

This course will focus on women and their role in history as well as the social and institutional obstacles they have encountered. Although art will not be the primary focus, we will begin with Linda Nochlin’s pivotal question in 1971: “Why are there no great women artists?” The sculpture The Dinner Party, by Judy Chicago then will serve as a bridge between the issues brought up in Nochlin’s article about women artists specifically to a more general study of women in various fields.

World Crisis and Conflict
An examination of current conflicts and crises around the world from ISIS to Ukraine and Boko Haram from the perspective of how Americans view these events and the perspectives from other parts of the world. Read more
World Crisis and Conflict

This seminar will explore selected crises from different perspectives, reading articles from local and European sources as well as from the US press and writers. The crises to be examined will include ISIS and Ukraine as well as a long-term conflict – Tibet. Students will prepare a research project examining a crisis of their choice examining the nature of the conflict as well as solutions to it.

The Necessity of Wilderness
In this course, we will explore the recreational, ecological, geological, historical and cultural values of wilderness and study the conservation and preservation movements for wilderness protection. Read more
The Necessity of Wilderness

Wilderness is “…an area where the earth and its community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain” (Wilderness Act of 1964), and I believe it must be experienced to be fully appreciated. In this course, we will explore the recreational, ecological, geological, historical and cultural values of wilderness and study the conservation and preservation movements for wilderness protection.

To begin this Archway Seminar, students spend six days exploring the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northeastern Minnesota by canoeing, portaging (carrying canoes, camping gear and food from one lake to another) and camping in this remote area. This experience serves as our case study for an exploration into the necessity of wilderness in North America, which we investigate during the Fall 2015 semester. This trip is a rugged wilderness experience with canoeing and portaging several miles each day, sometimes in difficult conditions (steep, rocky, muddy portages, carrying 50 lbs of equipment or more). No prior camping experience is necessary; however, you must be in good physical condition with no physical impairments to prevent successful performance of necessary trip activities.

Course enrollment is limited to 14 students. The wilderness trip begins Aug. 9, two weeks before the first official day of class. Interested students must complete an application (available on course website) by May 15 though selection for the class is rolling – the earlier you apply the more likely you will be selected. A fee of $300 (above other NWU fees) for this course, to offset trip costs, is due by June 29. http://www.wildernesslas.com

Courage, Compassion, and Connection: Creating an Open-Minded and Meaningful Life Journey
By studying wellbeing, community, and leadership, we will explore ways to live more openly, authentically, and deeply, while also empowering people around us to do the same. Read more
Courage, Compassion, and Connection: Creating an Open-Minded and Meaningful Life Journey

Life presents diverse opportunities to create a path that illuminates and celebrates your strengths and challenges. In Gifts of Imperfection Brené Brown helps us find resilience by cultivating vulnerability and openness. This class will require us to step outside of our comfort zone so that we can live more deeply and deliberately. Marianne Williamson said, “As we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” Together we can inspire people to embrace their authentic leadership roles.

What’s in a Tattoo?
This course explores the varieties of cultural –or counter-cultural- meanings associated with tattoos. Read more
What’s in a Tattoo?

The history of tattoos is global, rich, and complicated, so the “meaning” of tattoos can vary from culture to culture and over time. Today, people get tattoos for different reasons, but some people might get a tattoo for no particular reason at all. Some theorists say that tattoos represent a counter-cultural movement, while others say that tattoos are just another product of our consumer culture. Still others suggest that tattoos are not just, or not only, ‘fashionable,’ but that tattoos allow us to use our bodies as a canvas, as art, and so a tattoo is a permanent expression of individual identity; even if you can’t see it, my tattoo(s) mean something to me. While you do not need to want, get, or have a tattoo to be a member of this course, if you are –like me- curious about what tattoos do or can mean, and about why, while some people cannot stand tattoos, others can’t get enough of them, then it might be worth asking “what’s in a tattoo?”

Zombie Neuropsychology
This seminar will focus on zombies in order to explore basic principles of neuropsychology and the human brain. Read more
Zombie Neuropsychology

If zombies were real what would be going on in their brains? This seminar will focus on zombies in order to explore basic principles of neuropsychology and the human brain. Historical case studies of neurological disorders will help us understand how scientists learned about the human brain through its dysfunctions. For example, what happens when the body survives a disaster but the mind does not? We will intellectually wrestle with the idea of consciousness and whether there is a continuum of zombie-like behavior in humans.

History at the Movies
Explore what happens when filmmakers turn fact into fiction, by analyzing popular films about people and events from American history. Read more
History at the Movies

What happens when fact becomes fiction? How do filmmakers tell the stories of history? Can we learn something from watching a fictional version of an historical event? Where does the truth of history lie? In this course, we’ll explore these questions, and more, through analysis of films about people and events from American history in the 20th century. For example, we may look at such films as JFK, All the President’s Men, Saving Private Ryan, Apollo 13, and Zero Dark Thirty. In reading, writing, and talking about these questions, students will learn how to analyze films rhetorically and how to evaluate and interpret historical evidence.

What’s on your playlist? Music and Society
Students and the instructor will create a collaborative learning experience to explore the music we listen to right now and the musical artists and producers who create that music by critically analyzing the lyrics, musical content, and videos in order to gain a deeper understanding about what goes into making the music and how it interacts with our society. Read more
What’s on your playlist? Music and Society

The music we listen to, including its lyrics, musical content, videos, images, genres, artists, producers, and other aspects, expresses different societal beliefs. In addition, music can also influence social ideas. Together we will create a course outline that includes the many different types of music that are on each class member’s playlists. We will critically examine these chosen songs as well as research magazine articles, music blogs, Youtube comments, and the many other sources appropriate to the styles of music being studied. Analyzing these sources will lead us to better understand how the music we listen to both expresses and shapes our society. We will deal with questions such as: How is music consumed? How is music thought of? How is music produced? How does music shape our society? How does society shape the music we consume? What power do we have as consumers to shape the music we listen to?

Positive Psychology
Positive Psychology is the scientific study of optimal human functioning. This relatively new area of Psychology focuses on understanding and maximizing the behaviors and strategies that lead to a life of success and flourishing. Read more
Positive Psychology

The field of psychology has traditionally focused on understanding and treating the problems and mental illnesses that people encounter. The relatively new area of Positive Psychology instead focuses on understanding and maximizing the behaviors and strategies that lead to a successful and rewarding life. We will investigate this psychology that looks to help people thrive and flourish, not just provide intervention for the negative things. We will investigate questions such as, what strategies do people use to deal effectively with life? What do terms like “flow” and “in the zone” really mean and how do I get in it? What is “Authentic Happiness”? Can money make me happy? And what are my strengths and how can I effectively use them to my advantage?

The Seriousness of Humor
An exploration of why things are funny, how humor impacts mind and body, and how humor is used to make important arguments. Read more
The Seriousness of Humor

This course gives students the opportunity to look at the social phenomenon of humor through the lenses of research in various disciplines. Students will come to understand what makes something humorous as well as the impact of humor on the mind and body and in various contexts. Course material draws on the fields of sociology, psychology, physiology, medicine, communication, political science, business, education, linguistics and literature, as well as research from noted humor scholars.

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

  • Identify and explain the major contemporary humor theories.
  • Understand the body’s physiological responses to humor and laughter.
  • Appreciate the role of humor in interpersonal relationships.
  • Understand how humor affects teaching and learning environments.
  • Understand the role of humor in social and political commentary.
  • Evaluate humor for potentially adverse effects.
  • Identify various forms and styles of humor.

Previous College Credit

Will you have completed and received college credit for any college-level course work prior to your first semester at NWU? If so, please indicate where you will have earned the credits. Note: Request that an official transcript be sent to NWU.

List specifically the courses you plan to transfer in from Honors Academy (or other dual-enrollment programs), AP exams, or community/four-year college. Please provide the school name(s), course number(s), and course name(s). (Example: Southeast Community College, ENGL 1010, Composition I)
Co-Curricular Activities

At this time, do you plan to be in any of the following co-curricular activities that may affect your class schedule? If yes, please check the appropriate box(es) listed below:

We cannot guarantee a course schedule that accommodates a student’s off-campus job, and we recommend that a student work no more than 15 hours per week when possible. However, advisors will work with students to the degree possible to craft class schedules that align with their other responsibilities.