Course Descriptions

There are currently twelve Nebraska Wesleyan University departments that offer Honors Academy courses: Art, Business, Chemistry, Communications (courses are under review), English, Modern Languages, History, Mathematics, Physics, Psychology, and Religion. Cultural Geography is also available through the Education Department. A total of 30 separate courses are available in these areas. A school’s ability to offer courses depends entirely on the qualification of its staff members and the administration’s decision to allow qualified instructors to offer the courses. A given school may offer any of the following courses (numbers in brackets represent credit hours).

Art

Dr. Don Paoletta, Departmental Coordinator

Art 5: Basic Design (3)
A studio art exploration of basic design elements and principles using traditional media, ideation, and rough draft processes.

Art 130: Drawing 1: Basic Drawing (3)
An introduction to drawing by surveying its use as a foundation for future study in all 2D and 3D media.

Other courses may be reviewed.

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Business

Dr. Courtney Baillie, Departmental Coordinator

Business 31: Principles of Accounting I (3)
This is an introduction to the basic accounting model and the framework for developing financial statements. The major focus is on the study of generally accepted accounting principles as they apply to the measurement of income and the presentation of a firm’s financial position.

Business 32: Principles of Accounting II (3)
The role of accounting in the formation and capitalization of corporations is studied. Other topics include cash flow, analysis and interpretation of financial statements, and basic managerial accounting.
Prerequisite(s): Grade of "C-" or better in Accounting 31.

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Chemistry

Dr. David Treichel, Departmental Coordinator

Chemistry 51: Chemical Principles (3)
A study of the fundamental principles of chemistry including structures of atoms and molecules, periodicity, stoichiometry, reactions, solutions, gases and thermochemistry.

Chemistry 51L: Chemical Principles Laboratory (1)
Laboratory supporting Chemical Principles.

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English

Drs. Sarah Kelen and Jim Schaffer, Co-coordinators

English 1: English Language and Writing (3)
A course designed to help students write with clarity, confidence, and conviction through regular practice in writing (including argument and exposition, writing as discovery, and personal exploration). Particular attention will be given to the role of revision in the writing process. This course also includes a study of language and its social roles, with special attention to the origin, development, and current nature of the English language.

English 2: Composition, Language and Literature (3)
This is a course in which students develop their composition skills through reading and writing about literature. The course includes a discussion of multiple genres and of literary works’ historical and cultural contexts. Students will develop skills of writing in multiple forms and will learn the skills and terminology appropriate to discussing literary works in different genres. Students will receive instruction in writing skills such as structuring an argument, using evidence from multiple sources, using conventions appropriately, and refining an essay through revision.

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Geography

Dr. Michael McDonald, Departmental Coordinator

Geography 52. Cultural Geography (3)
A course that examines the spatial relationships of such phenomena as population, economic activity, and societal groups.

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History

Dr. Patrick Hayden-Roy, Department Coordinator

History 1: United States Society and Culture to 1877 (3)
A survey of United States history beginning with pre-contact cultures, examining the varied colonial and native cultures, and tracing the political, economic, social and cultural development of the United States, and concluding with Reconstruction.

History 2: United States Society and Culture since 1877 (3)
A survey of United States history beginning with post-Civil War expansion into the trans-Mississippi West, tracing political, economic, social, and cultural development to the present; emphasizing the emergence of a dominantly urban-industrial society, the expanded role of government, increasing government intervention in the lives of individuals, and the increasing involvement of the United States in the World.

History 10: Studies in World Civilization (3)
An in-depth study of one timeframe across world cultures. The course is designed to introduce students to the uniqueness and interconnectedness of cultures in the global community. Historical dimensions of today’s ethical and political concerns will be examined in order to foster responsible world citizenship.

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Mathematics

Don Olsen, Departmental Coordinator

Math 105: Calculus I (5)
An introduction to calculus of a single variable. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation and beginning integration, with applications. Assignments help build proficiency in the use of a computer algebra system.

Math 106: Calculus II (5)
A continuation of Math 105. Topics studied include integration techniques and applications, differential equations, numerical approximations, vectors and sequences and series. Assignments help build proficiency in the use of a computer algebra system.

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Modern Languages

Dr. Rita Ricaurte, Spanish Coordinator
Dr. JoAnn Fuess, German Coordinator,
Dr. Sara Dietzman, French Coordinator
Dr. Yuko Yamada, Japanese Coordinator
Jordan Milliken, French, German and Spanish Assessment

French 1: French: Stage I (4)
An introduction to the French language designed to develop skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and culture, with emphasis on practical communication.

French 2: French: Stage II (4)
Continuation of French 1.

French 101: French: Stage III (3)
Continuation of French stages I and II. This course continues to develop skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing and culture.

French 102: French: Stage IV (3)
Continuation of French stages I, II and III. This course continues to develop skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing and culture.

German 1: German: Stage I (4)
An introduction to the German language designed to develop skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing and culture.

Japanese 1: Japanese: Stage I (5)
An introduction to the Japanese language designed to develop skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing, and culture, with emphasis on practical communication.

Japanese 2: Japanese: Stage II (5)
Continuation of Japanese I.

Spanish 1 : Spanish: Stage I (4)
An introduction to the Spanish language designed to develop skills in aural comprehension, speaking, reading, writing and culture.

Spanish 2: Spanish: Stage II (4)
Continuation of Spanish 1.

Spanish 101: Spanish: Stage III (3)
Continuation of Spanish 1 and 2.

Spanish 102: Spanish: Stage IV (3)
Continuation of Spanish 101.

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Physics

Dr. William Wehrbein, Departmental Coordinator

Physics 101: Principles of Physics I (4)
The principles of classical mechanics, waves, light, electricity, and magnetism. Algebra and trigonometry will be utilized in descriptions and problems.

Physics 102: Principles of Physics II (4)
A continuation of Physics 101 with emphasis on waves, light, electricity and magnetism.

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Psychology

Dr. William McNeil, Departmental Coordinator

Psychology 1: Basic Psychological Science (3)
Lectures and demonstrations that present psychology as a science of behavior and mental processes. Emphasis is on the topics of scientific methodology, learning, memory, thinking, states of consciousness, language, sensation, perception, motivation, emotion, and the nervous system.

Psychology 2: Applied Psychological Science (3)
Lectures and demonstrations that present psychology as a science of behavior and mental processes. Emphasis is on the topics of scientific methodology, development, intelligence, personality description and assessment, psychopathology, psychotherapy, social psychology, and health psychology.

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Religion

Dr. Rita Lester, Departmental Coordinator

Religion 015: World Religions (3)
A study of the cultural settings, lives of founders when appropriate, oral or written tradition and literature, worldviews, myths, rituals, ideals of conduct and development of some of the world’s religions. Following a brief examination of possible evidence of religious practice among pre- historic peoples, religions studied typically include tribal religions, Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Shinto, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Sikhism and Bahai.

Religion 90 and 190: Selected Topics (3)
A topical course designed to investigate any relevant subject matter not included in the standard courses. The title, content, and credit will be determined by current mutual interests of students and faculty. This course may be offered to meet requirements for a major or minor only by approval of the department chair.

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