Careers

Table of Contents:

What Can I Do with a Political Communication Degree?

The field of political communication usually concerns two main areas: election campaigns or government operations. With the global market, many government agencies, legislators, corporations, public relation firms and publishing companies are seeking professionals having an understanding of working within and communicating with different cultures around the world to conduct business, manage personnel and market products and services. Organizations are increasingly emphasizing community outreach and human relations as a way to enhance their reputation and visibility. Increased use of social media also is expected to increase employment growth.

Graduate Studies

An undergraduate degree in political communication is good preparation for graduate study in areas such as political science, public administration, foreign policy, law, business and more. Political scientists need a master’s degree or Ph.D. in political science, public administration or a related field.

Job Opportunities

For detailed information about political communication career opportunities, see also Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook: Political Scientists, Public Relations Managers and Specialists and Reporters, Correspondents and Broadcast News Analysts.

Because the federal government employs more than half of all political scientists, employment growth will be tempered as overall employment in the federal government declines. In contrast, employment of public relations specialists is expected to grow 23 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations.

  • Activist, Advocate/Organizer
  • Campaign Management
  • Campaign Strategist
  • Political Party Administration
  • Congressional Office/Committee Staffer
  • Legislative Aide
  • Press Secretary
  • Speech Writer
  • Spokesperson
  • Reporter
  • Journalist/Editor
  • Political Commentator
  • Teacher
  • Analyst
  • Foreign Service Officer
  • Intelligence Officer
  • Research Specialist
  • Issues Analyst, Corporate Social Policy
  • Lobbyist
  • Political/Policy Analyst
  • Public Opinion Analyst
  • Public Relations Specialist/Manager
  • Political Website Content Writer/Blogger

What Can I Do with a Political Science Degree?

Political Science undergraduates may find entry-level jobs as working in town, city or state governments, in community affairs, planning, public policy, research assistant, analyst and program administration positions. Federal government opportunities may include intelligence, foreign service and legislative or judicial services. Many will also find positions outside of politics and policy in fields such as business and law. Eventually, you may wish to manage political campaigns or run for political office.

Graduate Studies

An undergraduate degree in political science is good preparation for graduate study in areas such as political science, public administration, foreign policy, law, business and more. Political scientists need a master’s degree or Ph.D. in political science, public administration or a related field.

Job Opportunities

For detailed information about Political Science degree career opportunities, see also Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook: Political Scientists and Meeting, Convention and Event Planners.

Because the federal government employs more than half of all political scientists, employment growth will be tempered as overall employment in the federal government declines.

  • Activist, Advocate/Organizer
  • Campaign Management
  • Political Party Administration
  • Congressional Office/Committee Staffer
  • Meeting, Convention and Event Planner
  • Pollster
  • Journalist
  • Political Commentator
  • Teacher
  • Analyst
  • Foreign Service Officer
  • Intelligence Officer
  • Research Specialist
  • Issues Analyst, Corporate Social Policy
  • Lobbyist
  • Policy Analyst
  • Public Opinion Analyst
  • Public Relations Specialist
  • Political Website Content Writer/Blogger