Careers

What Can I Do with a Physics Degree?

Some physics graduates become K-12 teachers. Other graduates will seek positions such as research assistants, high-level technicians, or computer specialists, as well as work in technical publishing or sales. Many industries employ physics majors: aerospace, scientific supply, remote sensing, communications, biotechnology, chemical, pharmaceutical, magnetic imaging, and automotive, etc. Graduates often will pursue graduate education in physics or other technical field.

Graduate Studies

More than a third of physics graduates continue with graduate studies. A graduate degree in physics can be the starting point for careers in many exciting fields such as astronomy/astrophysics, biophysics, chemical physics, condensed matter, engineering physics, geophysics, medical/health physics, optical physics, particle/high-energy physics or nuclear physics—even patent attorneys. Hospital Radiation Physicists are responsible for quality control measurements for radiation therapy.

Job Opportunities

For detailed information about physics degree career opportunities, see also Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook: Physicists and Astronomers.

  • K–12 Teachers, Physics/Math
  • Research Assistants
  • High-Level Technicians
  • Information Technology
  • Software development
  • Science/Technical Writer
  • Technical Sales
  • Financial Risk Management
  • Military